FR EN DE ES IT PT
Browse forums 
Ankama Trackers
Pinned

Hungry Mama's guide for Strength Enutrofs

By Disgustus April 01, 2013, 01:29:16
INTRODUCTION

I'm Hungry Mama, and you can call me anything, but just don't call me late for dinner. I've played Dofus since October of 2011 and in that time only played the Enutrof. I prefer to log one account and focus on one character, and as a result I feel like I've become very familiar with the Enutrof. I've played (and scrolled) a Chance/Wisdom Enutrof, an Omni Enutrof (all elements), and a Strength/Wisdom Enutrof. I'm presently playing a Strength/Wisdom Enutrof whom I love dearly – it works for me as a solo-accounter, I'm having a lot of fun, and now I want to share my experience with you.

FOR A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS

From the official Dofus website: “Enutrofs are helplessly covetous treasure Hunters. They are interested in any kind of goods, items, or creatures that can be turned into Kamas. The first thing an Enutrof does when he meets another adventurer is count his value with a single, sweeping look. In the eyes of an Enutrof, an adventurer is nothing but a vessel full of valuable goods and items!”

At the time of this writing, the developers of Dofus are in the process of a long-term overhaul to the Enutrof class. The Enutrof did for some time have +20 prospection points as compensation for reduced combat abilities, but as of the 2.10 update, this bonus has been removed after substantial changes were made to the its Strength, Chance, and Intelligence character builds (and the Agility build was completely eliminated.) Also at the time of this writing, the Enutrof's Living Chest summon can still give the player a second loot roll – the developers have stated that they believe it was a mistake in game design to give this advantage to the Enutrof and that they will in a future update remove this feature. What will become of the Enutrof's role as a treasure hunter? Only time will tell, but it's probable that the second loot roll will be replaced by a global prospection bonus. Whenever that change happens, I'll be sure to update this guide.

FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE

Despite the Enutrof's increasingly ambiguous role as a treasure hunter, it still has several advantages which make it an attractive member of any party. First, the Enutrof has strong potential for reducing the enemy's movement points and range. This means for you and your teammates that you can slow (or even stop) an enemy mob's advance and line them up like toy ducks in a carnival-style shooting game: Clumsiness can slow an advance, Pull-Out can stop an advance completely, and Reducing Key can effectively disable ranged attackers' ability to reach out from a distance.

Second, the Enutrof enjoys a variety of ranged attacks in three elements. Unlike other classes, the Enutrof may fight at mid- to long-range without the need to approach an enemy and suffer injury at close range. The Enutrof's mid- to long-range attacks paired with the movement-point reduction abilities previously mentioned give it the ability to make advancing foes either hide and wait for support or else make a long, slow advance against a steady barrage of offensive spells. Mound is a terrific area-effect spell for three action-points, Shovel Throwing is a solid, consistently hard-hitting ranged attack, and Prime of Life is a non-reducible, malus-imposing lethal-attack which, when used with Clumsiness, poses a frustrating defense and provides the Enutrof with additional opportunity to escape.

Third, the Enutrof may play the role of summoner, albeit limited in comparison to the Osamodas. The Entrof's summons serve a variety of roles which make a solo-accounter a stronger fighter and fill gaps in a larger party. The Enutrof's Living Bag provides a measure of defense similar to what you can get from either the Feca or the Masqueraider; this shield gives the Enutrof an added barrier of defense but also the ability to protect allies. The Enutrof's Living Shovel is difficult to use, but when correctly deployed is capable of blocking an enemy's line of sight and disrupting an enemy team's movement and positioning. At the time of this writing, the Enutrof's Living Chest is on notice: the developers have stated that they will be removing its ability to drop an extra loot roll, but even without that it has a moderately effective ability to reveal hidden objects, strong enough resistances to trigger traps, and – when its health begins to drop – is capable of contributing to the Enutrof's offensive line.

Fourth, the Enutrof is capable of providing heals in the absence of an Eniripsa. Pandora's Box doesn't seem like much, but it makes a big difference over the duration of a long fight. It's inconvenient that Bribery disables your ability to use a close-combat weapon, but is a powerful tool in the right circumstances. When paired with Ghostly Shovel, it's a terrific tool to heal allies without their loss of a turn.

Fifth, the Enutrof can de-buff allies and enemies. Ghostly Shovel, at 3 action points per cast, is capable of removing one turn's duration of effects per target twice per turn. The Sadida also has a strong ability to de-buff allies and enemies, but its Insolent Bramble is only able to hit linear targets, deals no damage, and at its highest level has a three-turn cool-down to recast. This means that over three turns the Enutrof can de-buff six turns' duration of effects while still sustaining its offensive line.

Sixth, the Enutrof is capable of helping itself and its allies escape from a tight spot and pounce when the time is right with the use of Fortune, Acceleration, and Greed. Level 6 Fortune's +300 Power paired with level 6 Greed's +160 power plus Weapon Skill's +300% melee damage can stack with a strong +element or +power set to give the Enutrof with a sense of timing one heck of a smack. The Enutrof can also use Fortune, Acceleration, and Greed in tandem with an Iop's, Ecaflip's, or Sram's buffs to give the team attacker a mighty surge. The Enutrof's ability to buff its own and its allies power is no joke: on a team lacking a heavy hitter, the Enutrof can buff its allies to the point that its absence may not be noticed.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

The good thing about the Enutrof is that it is a strong ranged attacker with a variety of spells to control the battlefield and disrupt an enemy's careful planning. The Enutrof is capable of completing a party's absent roles and providing a buffer to help lower-hitting classes hit much harder. The bad thing about Enutrofs (more so the Chance Enutrof, less so the Strength Enutrof) is that their ability to control the battlefield through Clumsiness depends on Wisdom; this means that you'll either have to invest time and money into acquiring Wisdom scrolls, or else always be choosing between Strength and Wisdom. The ugly thing about Enutrofs is that they have despicably poor Agility caps and are practically nullified by range-reduction spells: it's very easy for you to get locked and trapped by an enemy with high agility, and you'll be having a very bad time if you get on the business end of a Cra's Bat Eye spell.

There are solutions and strategies to these fights, but in the end you must realize that every class is different and each has its own unique strengths and weaknesses: the Enutrof is not the Feca is not the Iop is not the Ecaflip is not the Cra is not the Foggernaut and so on. The Enutrof's strength is in staying away, and its weakness is getting too close, so if you're looking for a different type of game-play you need to pick another class.

CHARACTER POINT CAPS

The Enutrof's character point caps are laid out such that players are encouraged to follow either a pure Chance or Chance-hybrid build; however, the Enutrof also has favorable Strength caps, which lays out an alternate path to victory. The character caps are as follows:

Vitality
1:1

Wisdom
3:1

Strength
1-50 (1:1)
51-150 (2:1)
151-250 (3:1)
251-350 (4:1)
351 and up (5:1)

Chance
1-100 (1:1)
101-150 (2:1)
151-230 (3:1)
231-330 (4:1)
330 and up (5:1)

Intelligence
1-20 (1:1)
21-60 (2:1)
61-100 (3:1)
101-150 (4:1)
151 and up (5:1)

Agility
1-20 (1:1)
21-40 (2:1)
41-60 (3:1)
61-80 (4:1)
81 and up (5:1)

STRENGTH VS WISDOM VS VITALITY

If you're a new player and don't yet have a steady stream of income, then go ahead and put all your points into strength up to a base of 250 (the end of your 3:1 Strength cap.) After that, you'll want to put your points into either Wisdom or Vitality. The Strength Enutrof is different from the Chance Enutrof in that it is less reliant on Wisdom with respect to reducing movement points, more effectively reduces movement points at mid- to close-range, and is able to reduce an enemy's resistance to movement-point-reduction (and thus a stronger team player and more valued by Sadidas, Cras, and others who can reduce movement points.) Depending on your play style, you may also want to invest character points into your Vitality; however, be aware that an Enutrof – no matter your build – will never hit as hard as a Sram, Ecaflip, or Iop. This means that even if you have a strong close-combat game, you will ultimately depend on keeping your enemies at a distance. Because Wisdom governs your ability to reduce movement-points, you will ultimately want to put more points into Wisdom than Vitality.

If you're a veteran player and have a fat bank or the ability to gather Doploons for character point scrolls, then you will absolutely want to scroll your Wisdom and Strength. Many players say that when a character stat reaches the end of its 3:1 cap you should leave it and invest in another character stat such as Wisdom or Vitality; however, the Strength Enutrof benefits from the fact that his lethal-attack (Prime of Life) and Living Shovel both reduce the enemy's resistance to movement-point loss. This means that the Strength Enutrof (unlike the Chance Enutrof) is substantially less reliant on Wisdom for reducing movement-points, so if you have scrolled your Wisdom (and have a good Cawwot Dofus or +Wisdom mount or pet) you can push all your remaining points into either Strength or Vitality – it just depends on how you want to play your Enutrof. I encourage you to spend your time playing your class and not rushing as fast as possible to level 200 because this will teach you how to use your spells correctly and how to successfully play your Enutrof. I also encourage you to resist the urge to put all your character points into Wisdom thinking you'll beg you way to level 200 in a Prespic set because that's just embarrassing.

With respect to levelling your spells – and depending on your strategy – you can follow a few different paths. The first path is to level one spell at a time to level 5; this is a fair strategy if you're playing with high-leveled friends who are helping you gain character experience (also called leeching.) After all, if you're only going to spend a few weeks (or a few days) between level 1 and level 100, there's not much point in being choosy how to distribute your spell points; however, if you're like me and probably the majority of other players, you're going to spend a bit of time playing solo, grouping with people your own level, and making slower character progress because you're working on your professions at the same time.

I recommend that you first raise each spell to level 4. The reasoning behind this is that the Enutrof depends on a variety of spells to control the battlefield and survive in combat. You'll need six spell points per spell you raise to level 4, so this gives you a lot of flexibility to work with your set, mount, weapon, and trophy bonuses to determine which spells you need at level 5 first and which spells can wait. I recommend this strategy because the Enutrof depends on the synergy of several staple spells to succeed in battle and you'll only be handicapping yourself if you insist on following a “level X spell to 5, then level Y spell to 5, then level Z spell to 5” sort of path.

CLASS SPELLS

The Strength Enutrof will depend on the following spells; they are listed according to the level at which they are obtained and grouped by category:

SUMMONS

Living Bag: level 1
Living Bag is an essential spell without which no self-respecting Enutrof would venture into the world. The Living Bag is your all-purpose shield: it takes damage based on your resistances, so as a Strength Enutrof you can shop around for a resistance-maged sets at your level and reap the benefit. The Living Bag is also a spectacular tool for shielding hard-hitting allies and hit-taking tanks who need just another turn or two to wipe out a mob. The Living Bag doesn't require line-of-sight, so this means you can hide behind an ally or an obstacle and cast away without entering the line of fire.

Living Shovel: level 26
Since the 2.10 update, the Living Shovel has been moved from level 90 to level 26. This is a great boon for the Enutrof since the Living Shovel is a primary tool for controlling the battlefield. Like the Living Bag, the Living Shovel doesn't require a line of sight to cast, which means you can pick and choose where to put it.

A word of wisdom to the Enutrof: the Living Shovel is a great tool, but is also difficult to use easily. The best way to use it is to deploy it against an enemy already close to a wall (thus trapping it in a crevice); against an enemy trying to hide behind an obstacle (thus pushing it into the open for your allies to attack); or against an enemy to push it into either your team's or its own offensive glyphs. The worst way to use Living Shovel is to cast it in an open area in front of an enemy: if you deploy it in this manner, the enemy can just walk around the shovel and position itself between you and the shovel. Then on the next turn, the Living Shovel will push the enemy closer to you.

For better and for worse, the Living Shovel has poor artificial intelligence and doesn't distinguish between “pushing the enemy away from you” and “pushing the enemy toward you.” The only thing this summon will do is push and impose a move-point-loss malus, so this means you need to use Clumsiness against your own summon to limit its movement points; doing so will help you control its movement and better predict its positioning. I have used Living Shovel successfully in player-vs-player combat, but it requires careful planning and execution to make it work. Living Shovel is also a great tool for the single-accounter in player-vs-monster combat: I often use it to distract Frigost monsters for a few turns while I make an escape. If you don't want to level this spell, you can put the points into Weapon Skill or Mass Clumsiness.

Living Chest: level 100
The Living Chest is a magnificent thing. At the time of this writing, it still gives a second loot roll, and I absolutely adore it for the money it earns me; however, I also adore it for the added offensive options it provides. As a Strength Enutrof, I can hit in Earth with my spells and Neutral with my melee weapon, but the Living Chest attacks in the element of Water; this means for me that I can attack a larger variety of mobs with less fear of their resistances. The Living Chest also hits on all four adjoining cells, so it provides another area-effect attack. Since the 2.10 update, the Living Chest is also able to reveal hidden objects (invisible players and traps); this is moderately useful against Srams in player-vs-player combat, but is also very useful against a variety of monsters in player-vs-monster combat.

The Living Chest is a terrific meat shield and does a lovely job of blocking enemies' line of sight and triggering carefully laid traps, but it must be said that it deals no damage unless it's hurt. In fact, the fewer hit points it has, the more damage it deals. In player-vs-player combat, other players will know better than to attack your summon, so you'll have to hit it a few times to get it started, but once it's reached half- or quarter-health, you can summon a Living Bag. Remember – the Living Bag takes damage according to the target's resistances, and with the Living Chest's high resists, you'll get great value for the cost of your summon.
ATTACKS

Shovel Throwing: level 1
Don't underestimate this spell: it's a staple attack for the Strength Enutrof and its 1/40 critical-hit ratio will roll good more often than you expect. It's easy to criticize Shovel Throwing – it is, after all, a four action-point spell with no additional effects – but compared to the Enutrof's spells in other elements is actually quite nice. Compared to Shovel of Judgment, Shovel Throwing has longer range and higher base damage which means for you that you're able to deal more damage and keep greater distance than the Chance Enutrof. The difference between Shovel Throwing and Shovel of Judgment is in the lethal attacks of the same elements: Prime of Life (Earth) reduces resistance to move-point loss, whereas Slaughtering Shovel simply deals damage. In other words, the Strength Enutrof trades an effect on his mid-level attack for an effect on his lethal attack.

The other advantage the Strength Enutrof has over the Chance Enutrof is that he gets his attacks earlier (levels 1, 13, and 21), whereas the Chance Enutrof must wait until levels 60 and 70 for his medium- and lethal-attack spells. This means that the Strength Enutrof can reach level 6 on all of his attacks sooner than the Chance Enutrof and possesses stronger offensive capabilities earlier than the Chance Enutrof. I have Shovel Throwing at level 6 and I use it every fight – I don't know how I'd get by without it.

Mound: level 13
Oh, Mound, glorious Mound – you are a blessing from Lord Enutrof himself. Compare Mound to the area-effect spells of other classes:

  • The Osamodas' Punch of Crackler is a close-range attack with a non-extendable range of 1 which hits on a cross of three cells and until level 6 is restricted to one cast per turn.
  • The Iop's four action-point Sword of Iop is a linear attack with a non-extendable range of 1-5 which hits on a cross of four cells.
  • The Pandawa's two action-point Explosive Flask is a linear attack with a range of 2-5 which hits on a cross of three cells and is restricted to one cast per turn.
  • The Sadida's three action-point Manifold Bramble is a linear attack with a non-extendable range of 0-7 which hits on an area of five cells and is restricted to one cast per turn.
  • The Xelor's five action-point Temporal Dust is a non-linear attack with a range of 0-7 which hits on a cross of three cells.
  • The Cra's four action-point Explosive Arrow is a non-linear attack with an extendable range of 1-8 and hits on an area of three cells.
  • The Enutrof's three action point Mound is a non-linear attack with an extendable range of 2-8 which hits on a cross of seven cells
So in comparison, the Enutrof's three action-point, extended-range, 1/30 critical-hit, area-effect attack is looking pretty good. The fact that Mound is non-linear means that the Enutrof also has substantially greater flexibility and ability to maneuver than other classes which must put themselves both close to and (for maximum damage) directly facing their targets. The only other class with a non-linear, ranged, extendable, area-effect attack similar to the Enutrof's is the Cra, but unlike the Enutrof the Cra's attack is four action-points and hits on an area less than half as large as the Enutrof's.

The other terrific thing about Mound (and all area-effect spells, really) is that you can use it to hit behind and around obstacles, effectively giving you a spell which doesn't require line-of-sight. Finally, Mound has identical range to the Chance Enutrof's Coins Throwing because of its seven-cell cross area-effect and ability to hit targets on the other side of a barrier. Coins Throwing has a maximum range of 12 and Mound has a maximum range of 8; however, the edge of Mound's seven-cell cross extends out to provide a combined range of 12.

In other words, Coins Throwing and Mound have the same range, which means that the Strength Enutrof can play the range-game as well as the Chance Enutrof. For just three action-points, the Enutrof with 10 action-points can cast it twice per turn with room left over for Shovel Throwing, Prime of Life, or a few casts of other support spells. When combined with strong +Strength or +Power gear, the Strength Enutrof's Mound is an efficient, low-cost attack that can't be blocked by hiding behind obstacles, summons, or turrets.

Prime of Life: level 21
Before the 2.10 update, Enutrof's had two Agility spells: Prime of Life (an attack which stole movement points) and Unsummoning (an attack which only affected summons.) After the 2.10 update, the developers revised the Enutrof, changed the elements of Prime of Life and Unsummoning respectively to Earth and Fire, and changed their effect. Prime of Life, formerly a low-hitting Agility spell, became a heavy-hitting Strength spell with the added bonus that for two turns it significantly reduces the target's resistance to losing movement points. The Chance Enutrof's Slaughtering Shovel deals more damage and has greater range, but the Strength Enutrof's Prime of Life is fixed range (meaning it can't be reduced by the Cra's Bat Eye) and its added bonus of reducing resistance to move-point loss makes the Strength Enutrof less dependent on Wisdom than the Chance Enutrof who needs high movement-point reduction abilities to fully utilize Shovel of Judgment. On top of all this, Slaughtering Shovel costs five action-points to cast, unlike Prime of Life which requires only four action-points. In comparison, I think the Strength Enutrof is getting the better deal: high damage, comparatively low action-points to cast, two casts per turn, non-reducible range, and an added bonus? I know which spell is the better value.

However, having said all that, the Strength Enutrof cannot use his Prime of Life as freely as the Chance Enutrof may use his Slaughtering Shovel. Because Prime of Life has a shorter fixed range, the Strength Enutrof should not charge into the middle of combat just to cast it. I find in my experience in both PvP and PvM that Prime of Life is a threat to dangle in front of your enemies: “Are you sure you want to come that close? Because, you know... you can do that if you want, but I'm gonna smack you.” The Strength Enutrof must use Prime of Life like a fencer: he controls the distance between himself and his foe, dancing in and out of mid- to long-range, and using Prime of Life to give his foe a painful reminder that he should keep his distance. In practice, I use Prime of Life and Shovel Throwing as the same spell, the only difference being that I use Prime of Life when it's time to make an advancing enemy sit still and Shovel Throwing when they're a safe distance away.

The other advantage Prime of Life has over both Shovel of Judgment and Slaughtering Shovel is that it doesn't reduce movement-points, but reduces the target's resistance to losing movement-points. What this means for you is that Strength Enutrofs will be more valuable as part of a team: Sadidas, Cras, and others who can reduce movement-points will utilize this malus as a group to utterly and completely remove an enemy's ability to move. In a group, this is extra useful for player-vs-player combat, but also in player-vs-monster combat: dungeon bosses like the Bworker come to mind, as do others with instant-kills whom you want to keep away from your team and glued to one spot.

BUFFS AND HEALS

Acceleration: level 6
Like Living Bag, no self-respecting Enutrof would be seen without this spell. Acceleration is a staple spell and also essential to the Enutrof's ability to keep away. At level 6 Acceleration has a very short cool-down to recast, but that doesn't mean you can use it carelessly. Pretend, if you will, that a werewolf is going to break through your front door at any moment and Acceleration is your one and only silver bullet. No, seriously – Acceleration is that valuable. If you're five to six cells away from your target, that's probably too far away to bother using Acceleration; instead, you'll likely want to save it for when your enemy locks you and you've got to use Fortune to boost your dodge and position yourself for your next attack.

But don't be fooled: Acceleration is not just about escaping but also about advancing. The Enutrof depends on his ability to keep away, but from time to time you'll find that your enemy is in a vulnerable state between buffs and heals and is hoping for the sake of his honor points that you can't close the distance; in this case, you can use Acceleration to mount a fast cavalry charge with the help of Greed, Fortune, or Weapon Skill and smack your enemy for some massive damage.

Greed: level 31
Before the 2.10 update, Greed buffed only Strength and Intelligence and was principally used by drop-mule Chance Enutrofs to compliment an Iop's attacks and an Eniripsa's heals. Greed also had a five-turn duration which meant that it was very dangerous for the Enutrof to deploy and in the case of Intelligence Enutrofs they were required to spam Ghostly Shovel to de-buff their enemies before they got too close.

After the 2.10 update, Greed's duration and cool-down to recast are both shorter and instead of buffing just Strength and Intelligence it now buffs Power. For the Enutrof this means that Greed can now be used to increase the power of Water spells, but for teams with an Enutrof this means that everybody benefits regardless of their primary offensive element. Many Enutrofs cried foul at the new Greed's shorter duration, but in practice this means that it's easier to use without fear of a seriously buffed mob of enemies running up on you. The Enutrof no longer needs to spam Ghostly Shovel to de-buff the enemy and the shorter duration means that it's easier to use Clumsiness to slow down an enemy and simply keep out of range until the end of Greed's buff. Greed is fantastic and is an invaluable tool for solo and group play.

Fortune: level 54
Before the 2.10 update, Fortune was only used by Chance Enutrofs to buff their Water attacks. The spell also gave a few extra points of prospection, but in my opinion the bonus was marginal. In response to complaints from the player body and feedback provided by the Zentih, Fortune was changed in the 2.10 update to provide two turns of effects: a massive dodge bonus on the first turn, and a massive power bonus on second turn. Also in the 2.10 update, the elementary spell Release was changed to cost three action-points at all levels. Release has previously been a staple spell for the Enutrof – and some people say it still is – but with the massive dodge bonus provided by Fortune, Release has become less important.

In practice this means that you can still use Release when you need it, but you don't have to invest any spell points into its progression to lower its cost in action-points. Before the new Fortune, I used Release in every fight. After the new Fortune, I rarely use Release. Some players with limited vision complain that level 6 Fortune only gives 40 dodge, or the equivalent of +400 Agility, and that they're still getting locked by Agility Srams' doubles and other high-agility characters. Well, too bad – you can't have everything. Having massively high agility in order to lock an opponent is part of the ultimate play strategy of some classes who have few options except to get close and stay on top of their opponent. If you can't accept that, then you need to play another class.

Some players with limited vision also complain that Fortune isn't useful because it doesn't give the power bonus on the first turn, but all of the Enutrof's spells must be weighed against the class's primary strategy: keep away. Imagine, if you will, that you are fighting an Enutrof: you just closed the distance and locked the Enutrof, only to see him buff his dodge and escape to a better position. On top of that, the Enutrof will have a +300% power bonus on its next turn. What do you think you're going to do? Are you going to close the distance again and expose yourself to some really massive damage, or are you going to try and escape to safer ground? I think you'd want to back off and keep yourself away, and that fits into the Enutrof's ultimate defensive strategy. Some players with limited vision also don't appreciate that in combat against multiple opponents it's not always a matter of being locked by Enemy A and wanting to smack Enemy A, but about being locked or by Enemy A and wanting to smack Enemy B. And of course don't forget that you can always use Fortune on an ally: Iops, Ecaflips, Srams, Masqueraiders, and others with seriously over-the-top offensive spells will appreciate your ability to push their attacks into another universe.

Pandora's Box: level 9
Before the 2.10 update, Pandora's Box was a garbage spell. It either gave mediocre critical hits, or else it gave a very poor heal, but it never did both at the same time and you never knew which one it would do. Pandora's randomness and poor effects made it totally undesirable except to a few Intelligence Enutrofs. After the 2.10 update, Pandora's Box was changed to provide percentage-based heals. This change gave Enutrofs of any variety the ability to provide moderate heals regardless of their build. Part of what's great about this percentage-based heal is that it's not dependent on Intelligence: the Enutrof has very poor Intelligence caps, so having a percentage based heal helps it overcome this obstacle.

Pandora's Box doesn't seem like much, but it can make a big difference over the duration of a long fight. Pandora's heals are indexed to the maximum vitality of the target, so characters of any class who have invested scrolls or character points into vitality will notice a larger benefit. A word to the wise, though: don't waste your time casting this spell on your summons. Think about it: if Pandora's Box only heals 8% of the target's maximum vitality, and your target only has 600 hit-points, that means you're only healing 48 hit-points; however, if you cast it on a 4,000 hit-point Sacrier, you're healing 320 hit points. See the difference?

The only drawback to Pandora's Box is that the turn after the heal it imposes a movement-point reduction malus on the caster which makes it difficult to keep enemies away. This sounds really terrible, but in practice I've found that it's not a large concern. As a Strength Enutrof, I can smack my enemy with Prime of Life and significantly reduce their resistance to movement-point loss for two turns and if the timing is also right put my Living Shovel on them. If you're new to the World of Twelve and haven't established a strong flow of kamas, then you'll probably want to ignore Pandora's Box in favor of Weapon Skill or almost any other spell in your arsenal. Pandora's Box is better and better as your hit-points become higher and higher, so it makes sense that you're going to wait until after level 100 to start progressing this spell. If you don't want to level this spell, you can put the points into Weapon Skill or Mass Clumsiness.

Bribery: level 80
The Enutrof has several class spells useful for stopping an enemy: Clumsiness will slow an enemy to a crawl, Pull-Out will stop an enemy in its tracks, but Bribery will force the enemy to skip a turn. The downside to this is that Bribery heals 20% of your enemy's hit-points and also forbids you from using a close-combat weapon for two turns, but this malus is less severe since the 2.11 update and casting restrictions on close-combat weapons. In practice, I've found that I rarely want or need to use Bribery in player-vs-monster combat, the exceptions being against very powerful dungeon bosses. Instead, I've found that Bribery's greatest power is in player-vs-player combat and is especially useful against summons and turrets. Like Pandora's Box, Bribery's heals are indexed to the target's maximum vitality, so if you're fighting against a Foggernaut who just got his 1,000 hit-point harpooner to level three, you can feel pretty good about bribing it: after all, it's only going to heal 200 hit-points, and that's just a drop in the bucket.

Used against allies, Bribery heals 40% of the targets maximum hit-points, so this means against an ally with 2,500 hit-points you'll heal 1,000 hit-points and that's nothing to sneeze at. Of course, Bribery still makes the target skip a turn regardless of its status as friend or foe, so you'll want to pair Bribery with Ghostly Shovel to remove the malus. On a team without an Eniripsa, an Enutrof can make do with his heals and shields. It's certainly no replacement for strong, reliable, frequent heals provided by the Eniripsa, but it's still a great tactical advantage. Be aware that Bribery has a global cool-down of four turns, meaning that if another Enutrof on the team casts Bribery you'll have to wait a bit.

SPEED BUMPS

Pull-Out: purchase for Doploons at your class temple
Pull-out is a great spell, but having said that, I wouldn't invest any spell points into its progression. The primary reason I won't invest any spell points into Pull-Out is that it doesn't become any more powerful as it progresses. The secondary reason I won't invest any spell points into Pull-Out is that I rarely have either the need or the opportunity to cast it more than once per fight. The Enutrof is a deceptively difficult class to play because it requires the player to pay very close attention to conservation of action points, spells' cool-down time to recast, appropriate timing, and controlling the distance between oneself and one's enemies.

In solo-play, the Strength Enutrof will want to pair Pull-Out with Clumsiness, Greed, Fortune, and Mound to line up enemy mobs for several turns of massive hits. In a team, the Enutrof will use Pull-Out the same way: to position enemy mobs for area-effect attacks and line up targets for allies' finishing moves, but also to purchase time for an Eniripsa, Osamodas, Sadida, or Foggernaut to heal and buff the team or prepare for a greater assault. Pull-Out is also a powerful tool when paired with a Feca's glyphs, but like anything, it depends on appropriate timing, positioning, and opportunity.

Reducing Key: level 17
Reducing Key is one of the Enutrof's staple spells without which he will not survive. The great thing about Reducing Key is that you receive it at level 17, but surprisingly you won't need it very much until you start fighting level 70+ monsters, temple dopples, dungeon bosses, and other players. Before the 2.10 update, Reducing Key had a longer duration and longer cool-down to recast, but after the 2.10 update it was given a shorter duration and shorter cool-down to recast. Some players with limited vision cried foul at this change, but in practice it means that you can cast Reducing Key on more targets more often. You can wait to level Reducing Key until after level 50, but I remember that I didn't need it until almost level 100.

Clumsiness: level 42
Clumsiness is another staple spell for Enutrofs and it's something that you'll probably use in every fight. The upside is that Clumsiness costs only one action-point to cast and at level 6 can reduce three movement-points which, for the casting cost, is spectacular economy of action-points; the downside, however, is that Clumsiness is dependent on Wisdom and you probably won't have enough Wisdom to consistently reduce enemies' movement-points until almost level 100. So yes, absolutely, you need to invest spell-points into Clumsiness, but you have to weigh the progression of this spell against the progression of your character stats. Most Enutrof players will probably want to wait until after level 60 to begin progressing Clumsiness because they'll notice a larger benefit in their game-play by progressing other spells first.

Mass Clumsiness: level 48
In my experience, Mass Clumsiness costs too much to cast, is too difficult to use, and is too weak compared to action-point reduction spells found in other classes. The best situation in which an Enutrof would use Mass Clumsiness is when he's totally surrounded by a large mob of enemies. Mass Clumsiness is, like Clumsiness, dependent on Wisdom, so even though you get the spell at level 48, you probably won't have enough Wisdom to make it useful until after level 100. The shame of it is that Mass Clumsiness was reworked in the 2.9 update to have a shorter cool-down and cost fewer action-points to cast, yet it's still unwieldy and so situation-dependent that most Enutrof players prefer to invest their spell-points into something else; however, like all things, it depends on how you've built and play your Enutrof, so if Mass Clumsiness fits into your strategy then by all means you should use it.

ELEMENTARY SPELLS

Release: global drop; gather it yourself or purchase it on the market
Release is an elementary spell which when used causes your character to push back enemies on all sides for two to four cells depending on how high it's been levelled. Before the 2.10 update, Release had a comparatively high cost in action-points to cast at level 1 and progressively cost fewer action-points as it approached level 6; however, since the 2.10 update, its cost in action-points has been normalized across all levels to just three action-points. In practice, this means for Enutrofs that they can still use Release but that they won't need to steal any spell-points from Fortune in order to gain as large a benefit. Release still receives a shorter cool-down to recast as it progresses, but Enutrofs can survive with Fortune well enough that they aren't obligated to level this spell beyond level 1.

Weapon Skill: reward for completing Smith Dungeon
Before the 2.11 update, there was a weapon skill spell for each type of weapon in the game which meant you'd have to play Pokemon and “catch 'em all” (or buy 'em all) as you changed your melee weapon. This also meant that you had to unlearn your old weapon skill so you could learn the new weapon skill. After the 2.11 update, all weapon skills were replaced by a single weapon skill which directly buffs your weapon's power. It was also changed so that you had to possess minimum level requirements before you could raise it to certain levels.

In my experience, I did not possess a melee weapon worth using until after character level 120; before that, my spells did more damage and cost fewer action-points to use; however, the developers of Dofus have revised the close-combat system and made weapons more accessible to more players at earlier levels. For the Strength Enutrof, this means you can be very strong in close-combat when you pair Weapon Skill with Fortune or Greed (or both at once) for potentially a base +760% power buff (before counting your base Strength and set and mount bonuses.) I recommend levelling Weapon Skill before Clumsiness and Reducing Key because I think the close-combat bonus out-weighs a Wisdom-dependent spell and a spell you won't use until fighting either high-level monsters and other players.

MELEE WEAPONS

Before the 2.11 update, all classes in Dofus were restricted to the weapons they could choose. Their primary weapon dealt 100% damage, their secondary weapon dealt 95% damage, and all other tertiary weapons dealt 90% damage. In the case of Sacriers, all weapons dealt only 90% damage. For Enutrofs, their primary weapon was the shovel, and their secondary weapon was the hammer. After the 2.11 update, the developers revised the Weapon Skill spell and changed the weapon system so that any class could use any weapon and deal 100% damage without being restricted to primary, secondary, or tertiary preference. After the 2.11 update, the developers also changed shovels to deal damage as a two-cell linear area-effect extending out from the principal target. Axes were also changed so that they could hit not just targets on each side of the wielder, but also to the diagonal of the wielder.

These changes mean that all classes have equal opportunity with respect to their favored weapon and this also gives each class greater ability to overcome class limitations (ranged bows for classes with short-range spells, and powerful swords or hammers for classes with spells restricted by minimum-ranges.) For the Strength Enutrof, this means he can select weapons typically preferred by Iops, Masqueraiders, Pandawas, and Ecaflips, and with the help of Fortune, Greed, and Weapon Skill dish out some hearty damage. Axes are particularly attractive for Enutrofs because their diagonal targets allow the Enu to attack at close range without approaching toe-to-toe and getting locked. There are a lot of changes coming to the weapons available in Dofus after the 2.11 update and after it arrives this list may be inaccurate; if you see an inaccuracy, please reply to this thread or send me an Ankabox so I can fix it. Remember as in all things to balance your melee weapon against your set, mount, gear, spells, and preferred style of game-play. Also, you aren't limited to these weapons: your menu will expand substantially if you increase your Intelligence.

Early-game weapons: levels 1-75
  • Hevlalav hatchet
  • Terophyle Axe
  • Yew Axe
  • Walnut Cutter
  • Oak Killer
  • Stone Axe
  • Crack Axe
  • Nidanwa Axe
  • Purrin Axe
  • Treechnid Splitter
  • Powerful Twiggy Bow
  • Small Gobball Horn Bow
  • Treebow
  • Trunknydum
  • Koalak Bow
  • Penn Knives
  • Unlucky Knight's Broken Sword
  • Gobball Hammer
  • Tetra Hammer
  • Draugur Chafer Hammer
  • Refactor Hammer
  • Gobherd staff
  • Wa Wabbit's staff
  • Ambusher-Up
  • Treestaff
  • Shodonwa staff
  • Kanniball Andchain's Sceptre
  • Powerful Twiggy Sword
  • Smithy Sword
  • Small Ha Sword
  • Small Holy Sword
  • Great Smithy Sword
  • Holy Sword
  • Ha Sword
  • Powerful Smithy Sword
  • Karne Rider Blade
  • Great Ha Sword
  • Great Holy Sword
  • Powerful Holy Sword
  • Powerful Ha Sword
  • Slash
  • Little Bwork Blade
  • The Sad Blade
  • Fwell Sword
  • Knight Sword
  • Great Knight Sword
  • The Klebik
  • Powerful Knight Sword
  • Badoul's Mane
  • Crackler Blade
  • Shodanwa Sabre
  • Viopal Sword
  • Earth Kwakblade
  • Ogralimde's Sword
  • Efferves Sword
  • Craft Knife
  • Kwakwa Blade
  • Great Craft Knife
  • Pretty Blade
  • Yench Cutting Sword
  • Kralove Cutting Sword
  • Bloody Craft Knife
  • Slicing Fan
Mid-game weapons: levels 75-150
  • Terrdala Axe
  • Sandanwa Axe
  • Pole Axe
  • Dame Zel Axe
  • Lookabeer Axe
  • Bards' Hall
  • Minotoror Axe
  • The Warf Axe
  • Cheeken Axe
  • Dreggon Bow
  • Falistos's Maul
  • Fantal Hammer
  • Farle's Staff
  • Aga Dou's Staff
  • Disast Root
  • Lady Root
  • Dark Treestaff
  • Daggero's Staff
  • Yondanwa Staff
  • Granny Candy's Stick
  • Black Mel Root (for heals)
  • Root 'Een
  • The Hagogue Root
  • Earlik Branch
  • Barkritter Root (for Strength/Chance Enutrofs)
  • Slicing Fan
  • Sandanwa Sabre
  • Tyse Pick
  • Perfect Ecaflip Paw
  • Pink Claw
  • Stalk Sword
  • Crimson Claw
  • Killarity Sword
Late- to End-game weapons: levels 150-200
  • Sick Axe
  • Archetypal Bow (for heals)
  • Vigi Pirate Hammer
  • Ougaammer
  • Professor Xa's Shovel
  • Minotot Sceptre
  • Splinter Sprinter
  • Aermyne's Rolling Pin
  • Peccary Blade
  • Giger's Nightmare Blade
SETS


Early-game sets: levels 1 to 75

These sets are listed in order of the character level at which you may equip them. The idea here is not that you should progress from one set to another in this order, but that you can see what options are available to you and make the best choice based on your character level, available kamas, and game-play style. Also, this list does not include individual, non-set items available on the market: you should evaluate those pieces on your own time and decide which will work for you. Remember to include a Gelano at level 60 and a Powerful Dazzling Belt at level 80 for two extra action-points.

  • Boon Set : If you're new to Dofus, you absolutely should complete all the Incarnum quests and get your Boom set. It's not much, but it's a heck of a lot better than either running around naked or embarrassing yourself in a Piwi set.
  • Young Adventurer Set : Depending on your finances and whether you have any friends to help you along, your next step is going to be the Adventurer set. Adventurer set pieces can often be dropped from enemies, but you can also typically find the set pieces for sale on the market. The Adventurer Hat and Cape can be relatively expensive, but the full set will serve you well.
  • Gobball Set : The Gobball set is useful for Strength Enutrofs and also hybrid Strength/Intelligence Enutrofs. The set gives an additional action-point and if you get one with good Strength rolls you can probably stay in it until level 50 or higher.
  • Earth Kwak Set : This is a staple set for Strength characters and if properly maged also very good for player-vs-player combat. It's not difficult to craft, but the demand for the Kwak sets is relatively high so you'll probably find it less expensive to get your friends or your guild to help you gather the set pieces and craft the items for you.
  • Ancient Chafer Set : This set introduced in the 2.9 update provides a solid Strength bonus, buffs neutral damage, and gives an additional movement-point. Draugur Chafer Hammer is great with Weapon Skill spell in this set.
  • Treechnid Set : This set will reduce your move-points by one, but will increase your action-points by two and also buff your Strength. You may have a difficult time surviving if you can't keep away from your enemies, but this means you'll have more action-points to spend each turn for Shovel Throwing x 2, Prime of Life x 2, Mound x 2 plus other buffs, or Mound and Shovel Throwing or Prime of Life plus Acceleration. If you have any Wisdom yet, the Treechnid Staff will be fun for reducing action-points.
  • Green Scaraleaf Set : You won't get any action-point or movement-point bonuses from this set, but it gives really terrific Strength bonuses. You can get a terrific Strength bonus if you equip this full set and finish it out with pieces from the Earth Kwak set, but if you have a full Earth Kwak set you'll probably want to stay in it.
  • Crackler Set : This set doesn't give much in the way of +Strength, but it will give you some great resistances. Depending on your play style, you may enjoy shielding yourself with Living Bag and tanking your way through a mob using Prime of Life and Weapon Skill.
  • Pippin Blop Set : Another solid +Strength set. You'll get an additional action-point, some extra range, and few more summons out of it, but you'll also get a -50% weakness to Air damage. Pick your poison.
  • Boowolf Set: Except for an extra action-point, this set will give you everything you need: +Strength, +Wisdom, and +Vitality. +Range, +Summon, and an extra movement-point. You can make up the extra action-point by equipping a Gelano and you'll be ready to go for both player-vs-monster and player-vs-player combat.
  • Royal Gobball Set : The pure-strength Enutrof may find the Boowolf set more attractive than the Royal Gobball set, but if you decide to go hybrid and incorporate Intelligence spells into your repertoire (Shovel Kiss, Ghostly Shovel, Unsummoning) then this set will be right up your alley.

Mid-game sets: levels 75-150

As before, these sets are listed in order of the character level at which you may equip them. The idea here is not that you should progress from one set to another in this order, but that you can see what options are available to you and make the best choice based on your character level, available kamas, and game-play style. Also, this list does not include individual, non-set items available on the market: you should evaluate those pieces on your own time and decide which will work for you.

  • Farle Ingalsse Set : If you can find a Strength-maged version of this set, you're in business: the set will buff your summons, range, action-points, movement-points, and power, making this an attractive set for almost any Strength character.
  • Royal Pippin Blop Set : the Royal Pippin set isn't spectacular, but it's only four pieces which means you can equip it with another set for potentially greater bonuses. It'll buff your action-points, movement-points, range, and summons, but it doesn't help your Strength as much as some of the other sets available to you at this level.
  • Terrdala Set : The Terrdala set is another great +Strength set and is terrific for player-vs-player combat, but to equip the entire set you must have at least rank 3. This set is everything you need: summons, range, action-points, movement-points, Strength, Vitality, and Wisdom. If you can get rank 3, this set will serve you very well.
  • Bwork Chief Set : Like the Farle Inglasse set, you'll want to find a Strength-maged version because it will last you a long time. Action-point, movement-points, range, and strong resists all make it a real treat.
  • Gorgoyle Set : Unless you're a hybrid Strength/Intelligence build, this set may not be for you unless you can find a Strength-maged version. If you can, everything you want is here.
  • Ancestral Set : The Ancestral set is great for hybrid Chance/Strength Enutrofs, but as a pure Strength Enutrof, there are better options. Having said that, the power, damage, range, action-point, and movement-point buffs are terrific.
  • Dreggon Set : This is a good set for the Chance/Intelligence/Strength Enutrof, or for any dual-element hybrid build in between. You'll get massive damage and power buffs, as well as strong resists, action-point, movement-points, range, and several summons. For the pure Strength Enutrof, there are better options available.
  • Moowolf Set: Like the Soft Oak set, if you can find one that's been nicely maged you could probably use it all the way until end-game levels. Moowolf set is great for any Strength character and has everything you want in a set: action and movement points, resistances, and great buffs for power, damage, strength, wisdom, and vitality.
  • Soft Oak Set: Like the Ancestral set, the Soft Oak set is for hybrid Enutrofs, this time for Intelligence/Strength builds. If you go that route, then a well-maged Soft Oak set can serve you all the way up to end-game. If you're not hybrid, then a strength-maged set could work well for you because it has all the terrific buffs you want in a set.
  • Royal Pingwin Set : The Royal Pingwin set is great for hybrid Chance/Strength Enutrofs, but the pure Strength Enutrof may not like it; however, having said that, it's only three pieces, so if you need to fill out another set then it might work wellf or you. Not much base Strength or Chance, but the power, damage, and resistances are well worth while.
  • Venerable Set (Cape Hernaum and Rememb Ring ): As a Strength Enutrof, you will not want to equip your full class set – even with all the fun spell bonuses, it will be a weak set and you'll find game-play to be difficult; however, if you have a few gaps in your set, you may want to fill them out with the Venerable set's cape and ring which will respectively buff your Mound, Living Bag, and Acceleration, as well as your Shovel Throwing, Greed, Reducing Key, and Clumsiness.

Late- to End-game sets: levels 150-200

As before, these sets are listed in order of the character level at which you may equip them. The idea here is not that you should progress from one set to another in this order, but that you can see what options are available to you and make the best choice based on your character level, available kamas, and game-play style. Also, this list does not include individual, non-set items available on the market: you should evaluate those pieces on your own time and decide which will work for you.

  • Obsidemon Set: Regardless of whether you're a hybrid Intelligence/Strength or pure Strength Enutrof, the Obsidemon set will be good for you. It gives everything you want in a set – action-point, movement-point, range, and summons, but it also gives Strength, Wisdom, Vitality, earth damage, neutral damage, and a +power buff. The set also provides a +dodge bonus (especially good for Enutrofs) as well as a variety of resistances.
  • Funguset: This set won't give you an action-point bonus, but then, it's only three pieces and it still gives Strength, Wisdom, Vitality, and some terrific resistances.
  • Berserker Bworker Set: If you can't find a Strength-maged version of this set, then you're probably better off looking for something else.
  • Borealis Set: Strong buffs, great resistances, lovely damage, good dodge, and the summons and range are lovely, but it doesn't give an action-point so you may be better off waiting for something else or just using its pieces to fill out a custom set.
  • Fuji Snowfoux Set: You'll get a massive Vitality and +power buff out of this set – and the MP reduction bonus is quite nice - but unless you can find a version of this maged for Strength, then you might want something else.
  • Professor Xa Set: This is an outstanding set for dual- or tri-element Enutrofs. Truly, if you're dual- or tri-element, this set doesn't leave much else to be desired. Well worth crafting or purchasing if it fits into your strategy.
  • Hail Set: Good for pure Strength and hybrid Chance/Strength Entrofs; the set provides a massive power and damage buff, good resists, plus summons, action-point, and movement-point.
  • Brouce Boulgoure Set: As far as pure-Strength sets go, the Broucey set is quite nearly everything you need. Strength, Vitality, and Wisdom, plus neutral and earth damage buffs, strong resists, dodge, range, movement-point, and action-point. Pairs nicely with other sets but also goes very well with a variety of individual non-set pieces.

Frigost 3 Sets
Needless to say, if you've reached this character level you've probably got a good idea where you want to go with your gear; however, for the sake of completeness, I've included the Frigost 3 sets. Remember that all these sets are only a few items which means that you're going to have to mix and match them with other pieces. Also, like the other categories of gear, this list does not included individual non-set pieces of equipment - you'll need to review those on your own time.
  • Count Harebourg Set - Strong +Strength bonuses, but this set significantly reduces your neutral damage and thus your ability to fight with a neutral-damage melee weapon. It also lowers resists most of your resistsances and your initiative.
  • Treadfast Set - This is a great set for Strength/Intelligence hybrid Enus. Pair it with another set to take best advantage of its +power bonuses.
  • Nocturnowl Set - reduces critical hits and critical hit damage, but still a strong set for enus who like to play close.
  • Vicieuse Set - I'm not sure what the English spelling is since I can only find this set listed in French, but it's attractive for Enus because of its strong MP reduction bonuses. The +agility and dodge bonuses are also useful for helping the Enu escape.
  • Missiz Freezz Set - This is a fantastic set for any strength based character, but having said that, Enus should be cautious because it lowers initiative and dodge which will make it easier for your enemies to lock you.
  • Sylargh Set - Lovely bit of gear, this: powerful +strength set with strong +damage bonuses. The only draw-back is that it has no AP bonus, so pair it with another set to get the best result.

TROPHIES AND DOFUS

Dozens of trophies, trophies for you! Yes, it's true, everything you could every possibly want is now available to you through the powerful, sparkly, shiny, and expensive trophies crafted by Shieldsmiths. Like I've said a bunch of times in this guide, there's rule saying that you absolutely must play your Enutrof a certain way. Heck, if you want to build an Agility Enutrof and craft it so you can run around with daggers and charge head first into close-combat, that's your prerogative. And fortunately for you, there are enough trophies out there I suppose if your heart was really set on it you could make something that worked. But... having said that... as a Strength Enutrof you'll probably want some combination of the following trophies. Remember that minor trophies are equipped after level 50, medium trophies are equipped after level 100, and major trophies are equipped after level 150.

  • Survivor (vitality)
  • Maniac (strength)
  • Friction (movement-point reduction)
  • Escapist (dodge)
  • Twitcher (range)
  • Goliath (strength at the cost of vitality)
  • Shackler (movement-point reduction at the cost of vulnerability to action-point removal)
  • Voyager
  • Jackanapes

Survivor, Maniac, and Friction are just about the only trophies a Strength Enutrof will want. Escapist is quite useful, but with the bonus I receive from Fortune it's a low priority for me. I've experimented with the Earth Destroyer trophies, but linear-damage is less helpful for Strength spells than the percentage-based buff provided by the Maniac trophies. Friction, too, is a staple trophy for an Enutrof. Having a good Friction trophy will make you less dependent on Wisdom and will give you more consistent movement-point reduction through Clumsiness. Twitcher is probably a low priority for you since you already have good range in Shovel Throwing and Mound (and Prime of Life has fixed range), but if you have space and think you really need then go for it. Shackler is terrific for an Enutrof, but of course be aware that it makes you spectacularly vulnerable to action-point reduction. Stay away from Xelors. The trophies have become quite diverse since the 2.10 update, so the only limitations are your imagination and your budget.

I'd caution you to be very careful with the Goliath trophy: if you've invested plenty of points into Vitality, then it can work for you, but often enough a battle could have gone the other way if not for the absence of a few hundred hit-points. Be cautious. The Voyager and Jackanapes trophies are useful for an additional movement-point and action-point, respectively, but I wouldn't accept the negative dodge, lock and movement-point they impose; however, if your set, weapon, and mount are enough to avoid this obstacle, then you can use them.

Regarding Dofus, the most important one you can get reasonably cheap or even on your own at a high enough level is a +Wisdom Cawwot Dofus. A Kaliptus Dofus is fun for the prospection bonus, but of course it won't help you at all in combat. If you hurry up and complete your Eternal Harvest quest then you can get yourself an action-point Ochre Dofus, but that can take a while... well, it can also take dozens of millions of kamas, but I think that's out of the question for most people. Turquoise and Crimson Dofus are terrific if you can get them, but obtaining them is either a matter of luck or money.

MOUNTS

As usual, I'm not giving any straight and easy answers. When it comes to selecting your mount, remember as always to balance your mount against your melee weapon, set, trophies, dofus, and preferred style of play. If you depend on your summons and use them frequently, then choose an Almond breed. If you're more concerned about dishing about damage, then pick a Crimson breed. If you want to ensure that you can stay as far away as possible, then pick a Plum breed. If you want to maximize your movement-point reduction abilities, then pick a Golden breed. If you need extra vitality, then pick a Ginger breed. If you think the only thing you need to finish out your character is some extra movement-points, then pick an Emerald breed. There are so many mounts and so many ways to combine them with your character's gear and spell set that it really depends on what you make of it. Having said that, though, my personal preference is the Plum and Crimson... but don't let me influence your choice! The following list shows the mounts you'll probably want to choose for your Strength Enutrof and the bonuses they'll provide at level 100, so consider your options and choose wisely.

  • Almond: 2 summons
  • Almond and Crimson: 500 initiative, 50 vitality, 1 summon, 60 strength
  • Almond and Emerald: 500 initiative, 100 vitality, 1 summon, 1 movement-point
  • Almond and Golden: 500 initiative, 50 vitality, 25 wisdom, 1 summon
  • Crimson: 50 vitality, 80 strength
  • Crimson and Ginger: 150 vitality, 60 strength
  • Emerald and Crimson: 100 vitality, 1 movement-point, 30 strength
  • Golden and Crimson: 100 vitality, 25 wisdom, 60 strength
  • Plum and Crimson: 200 vitality, 1 range, 60 strength
  • Emerald: 200 vitality, 1 movement-point
  • Golden and Emerald: 100 vitality, 25 wisdom, 1 movement-point
  • Plum and Emerald: 200 vitality, 1 range, 1 movement-point
  • Ginger: 100 vitality
  • Almond and Ginger: 500 initiative, 100 vitality, 2 summons
  • Crimson and Ginger: 150 vitality, 60 strength
  • Emerald and Ginger: 300 vitality, 1 movement-point
  • Golden and Ginger: 100 vitality, 1 movement-point
  • Plum and Ginger: 300 vitality, 1 range
  • Plum and Golden: 200 vitality, 1 range, 25 wisdom


LEVEL-UP GUIDE

First thing I'm going to say is that brand-new, fresh-to-Incarnum players should stay in Incarnum and learn how to play the game: if you do all the missions and spend some time grouping with other players and learning how to play your class, you'll find it's quite easy to get to level 30. The Incarnum missions aren't hard to find - just run around and you'll probably discover them all on your own, or if you're the Wiki sort of person just click here. You'll also get a Boon set for your trouble which is good for a base +25 to all of your character stats. That'll be enough to get you started and when you finally go down to Astrub you'll be ready to open your world map and pick a new adventure.

Since the 2.11 update, a really cool new feature was added to the world map: the average level of monsters in that region. If you open your map and hover your cursor over a region, you'll see the coordinates of the cell you're targeting but you'll also see the entire region highlighted in its respective color (blue or red if Bonta or Brakmar owns it, or white if it's neutral) and an additional bit of text displaying the average level of monsters found in that region. This is significant because it's an in-game guide on where to take your character for levelling and gaining experience; however, having said that, the numbers can be a bit misleading.

What's important to remember is that the number you see is the level of monsters in that region, which is not the same as the average combined level of mobs in that region. For example, you might be level 15 and think by the guide that you can go to Gobball Corner and destroy everything in your sight, but when you get there you're going to find that you'll be up against mobs of anywhere between one and eight monsters for a combined average mob level of between 15 and 120. Obviously, level 30 mobs and higher are going to be a bit of a challenge for level 15 characters, so remember to make friends and travel in groups. When your character level (or the combined character level of all the players in your group) is closer to the combined level of all the monsters in a mob, you gain higher experience.

What this means for the solo-accounter who will spend a lot of time hunting by him or herself is that he or she should either go to regions close to his or her own character level and look for mobs of just one or two enemies, or else he or she should look for regions with monsters of an average level of about half his or her own character level and hunt those instead. For example, if you're a level 60 character, you can probably make better experience-per-minute hunting in the Lousy Pig plains which has an average monster level of 35, meaning that the average mob level will be between 35 and 280. If you stick to mobs with between one and three monsters, you'd probably be gaining experience faster than you would against single Kanigers on the Cania Plains.

Apart from that, remember that when looking for fast mobs that you'll want to focus on monsters who are weak to Earth damage or else who have no resistances to Earth damage. Anything in Incarnum, Piwis in Astrub, Field monsters above Astrub, Gobballs in Gobball Corner, Lousy Pigs on the Lousy Pig Plain, and monsters on the Sidimote Moore are all great choices because they have little or no resistances to earth damage. Depending on your play-style, Sidimote Moore can be a great place to level your character up to 100 and even beyond: with an average monster level of 40, this means the monsters will be fairly easy work and still give respectable experience for quite some time - just be sure to carry hit-point food or chain an Eniripsa to your ankle because with the Scurvions' and Ouginaks' mass-damage spells they'll really whittle away at your health points every fight.

And that's all she wrote! This guide ought to make the game much easier and more enjoyable for you than what I came up with as an Enutrof a couple years ago. Remember that even if you play as a solo- or multi-logger, you'll have more fun and make better progress if you group up with other players. Who knows - the lowby you meet on the recruiting channel today might be the end-game vet who helps you tomorrow. So bash some heads and have some fun!
3 -1
Reply
Reactions 15
Score : 2980

Lovely guide, thanks. Read it all!
Really makes me want to reset and play my 192 Enutrof again, and become Strength/Intelligence...

- Spirit

0 0
Reply
Score : 3868

looks really really good, however I still stick to my cha/wis enu, because its my only chance damage dealer and the pp is just awesome tongue 

0 0
Reply
Score : 1110

You forgot to add Moowolf Setwink 

0 0
Reply
Score : 5621
JCOLEROCNATION|2013-04-01 19:29:21
You forgot to add Moowolf Setwink

No idea how I missed that one; I know I was looking at it, but I must have thought I already added it to the list. Thanks for noticing!
0 0
Reply
Score : 907

Very detailed guide, good work! I currently have a lvl 143 Strength Enu and i absolutely love it. I scrolled 101 str and i am now working on 101 wisdom with doploons. I recommend this class to anybody who wants something different.

0 0
Reply
Score : 130

Amazing and well covered guide! And best part of it is that it is up to date! laugh 

0 0
Reply
Score : 27364

This should probably be updated to reflect some of the Frigost Three sets that are hitting the markets.

0 0
Reply
Score : 5621

You're right, I do have to add the Frigost 3 sets - I'm waiting right now to update this guide until the next patch on Tuesday because I also want to revise the levelling guide to include references to the average level shown on the world map. Big thanks to all who appreciate the time I put into it!

=============

There we go - Frigost 3 sets are added and I've revised the levelling guide since the addition of the average-level of monsters display on the world map.

0 0
Reply
Score : 265
Disgustus|2013-04-01 01:29:16
INTRODUCTION

I'm Hungry Mama, and you can call me anything, but just don't call me late for dinner. I've played Dofus since October of 2011 and in that time only played the Enutrof. I prefer to log one account and focus on one character, and as a result I feel like I've become very familiar with the Enutrof. I've played (and scrolled) a Chance/Wisdom Enutrof, an Omni Enutrof (all elements), and a Strength/Wisdom Enutrof. I'm presently playing a Strength/Wisdom Enutrof whom I love dearly – it works for me as a solo-accounter, I'm having a lot of fun, and now I want to share my experience with you.

FOR A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS

From the official Dofus website: “Enutrofs are helplessly covetous treasure Hunters. They are interested in any kind of goods, items, or creatures that can be turned into Kamas. The first thing an Enutrof does when he meets another adventurer is count his value with a single, sweeping look. In the eyes of an Enutrof, an adventurer is nothing but a vessel full of valuable goods and items!”

At the time of this writing, the developers of Dofus are in the process of a long-term overhaul to the Enutrof class. The Enutrof did for some time have +20 prospection points as compensation for reduced combat abilities, but as of the 2.10 update, this bonus has been removed after substantial changes were made to the its Strength, Chance, and Intelligence character builds (and the Agility build was completely eliminated.) Also at the time of this writing, the Enutrof's Living Chest summon can still give the player a second loot roll – the developers have stated that they believe it was a mistake in game design to give this advantage to the Enutrof and that they will in a future update remove this feature. What will become of the Enutrof's role as a treasure hunter? Only time will tell, but it's probable that the second loot roll will be replaced by a global prospection bonus. Whenever that change happens, I'll be sure to update this guide.

FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE

Despite the Enutrof's increasingly ambiguous role as a treasure hunter, it still has several advantages which make it an attractive member of any party. First, the Enutrof has strong potential for reducing the enemy's movement points and range. This means for you and your teammates that you can slow (or even stop) an enemy mob's advance and line them up like toy ducks in a carnival-style shooting game: Clumsiness can slow an advance, Pull-Out can stop an advance completely, and Reducing Key can effectively disable ranged attackers' ability to reach out from a distance.

Second, the Enutrof enjoys a variety of ranged attacks in three elements. Unlike other classes, the Enutrof may fight at mid- to long-range without the need to approach an enemy and suffer injury at close range. The Enutrof's mid- to long-range attacks paired with the movement-point reduction abilities previously mentioned give it the ability to make advancing foes either hide and wait for support or else make a long, slow advance against a steady barrage of offensive spells. Mound is a terrific area-effect spell for three action-points, Shovel Throwing is a solid, consistently hard-hitting ranged attack, and Prime of Life is a non-reducible, malus-imposing lethal-attack which, when used with Clumsiness, poses a frustrating defense and provides the Enutrof with additional opportunity to escape.

Third, the Enutrof may play the role of summoner, albeit limited in comparison to the Osamodas. The Entrof's summons serve a variety of roles which make a solo-accounter a stronger fighter and fill gaps in a larger party. The Enutrof's Living Bag provides a measure of defense similar to what you can get from either the Feca or the Masqueraider; this shield gives the Enutrof an added barrier of defense but also the ability to protect allies. The Enutrof's Living Shovel is difficult to use, but when correctly deployed is capable of blocking an enemy's line of sight and disrupting an enemy team's movement and positioning. At the time of this writing, the Enutrof's Living Chest is on notice: the developers have stated that they will be removing its ability to drop an extra loot roll, but even without that it has a moderately effective ability to reveal hidden objects, strong enough resistances to trigger traps, and – when its health begins to drop – is capable of contributing to the Enutrof's offensive line.

Fourth, the Enutrof is capable of providing heals in the absence of an Eniripsa. Pandora's Box doesn't seem like much, but it makes a big difference over the duration of a long fight. It's inconvenient that Bribery disables your ability to use a close-combat weapon, but is a powerful tool in the right circumstances. When paired with Ghostly Shovel, it's a terrific tool to heal allies without their loss of a turn.

Fifth, the Enutrof can de-buff allies and enemies. Ghostly Shovel, at 3 action points per cast, is capable of removing one turn's duration of effects per target twice per turn. The Sadida also has a strong ability to de-buff allies and enemies, but its Insolent Bramble is only able to hit linear targets, deals no damage, and at its highest level has a three-turn cool-down to recast. This means that over three turns the Enutrof can de-buff six turns' duration of effects while still sustaining its offensive line.

Sixth, the Enutrof is capable of helping itself and its allies escape from a tight spot and pounce when the time is right with the use of Fortune, Acceleration, and Greed. Level 6 Fortune's +300 Power paired with level 6 Greed's +160 power plus Weapon Skill's +300% melee damage can stack with a strong +element or +power set to give the Enutrof with a sense of timing one heck of a smack. The Enutrof can also use Fortune, Acceleration, and Greed in tandem with an Iop's, Ecaflip's, or Sram's buffs to give the team attacker a mighty surge. The Enutrof's ability to buff its own and its allies power is no joke: on a team lacking a heavy hitter, the Enutrof can buff its allies to the point that its absence may not be noticed.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

The good thing about the Enutrof is that it is a strong ranged attacker with a variety of spells to control the battlefield and disrupt an enemy's careful planning. The Enutrof is capable of completing a party's absent roles and providing a buffer to help lower-hitting classes hit much harder. The bad thing about Enutrofs (more so the Chance Enutrof, less so the Strength Enutrof) is that their ability to control the battlefield through Clumsiness depends on Wisdom; this means that you'll either have to invest time and money into acquiring Wisdom scrolls, or else always be choosing between Strength and Wisdom. The ugly thing about Enutrofs is that they have despicably poor Agility caps and are practically nullified by range-reduction spells: it's very easy for you to get locked and trapped by an enemy with high agility, and you'll be having a very bad time if you get on the business end of a Cra's Bat Eye spell.

There are solutions and strategies to these fights, but in the end you must realize that every class is different and each has its own unique strengths and weaknesses: the Enutrof is not the Feca is not the Iop is not the Ecaflip is not the Cra is not the Foggernaut and so on. The Enutrof's strength is in staying away, and its weakness is getting too close, so if you're looking for a different type of game-play you need to pick another class.

CHARACTER POINT CAPS

The Enutrof's character point caps are laid out such that players are encouraged to follow either a pure Chance or Chance-hybrid build; however, the Enutrof also has favorable Strength caps, which lays out an alternate path to victory. The character caps are as follows:

Vitality
1:1

Wisdom
3:1

Strength
1-50 (1:1)
51-150 (2:1)
151-250 (3:1)
251-350 (4:1)
351 and up (5:1)

Chance
1-100 (1:1)
101-150 (2:1)
151-230 (3:1)
231-330 (4:1)
330 and up (5:1)

Intelligence
1-20 (1:1)
21-60 (2:1)
61-100 (3:1)
101-150 (4:1)
151 and up (5:1)

Agility
1-20 (1:1)
21-40 (2:1)
41-60 (3:1)
61-80 (4:1)
81 and up (5:1)

STRENGTH VS WISDOM VS VITALITY

If you're a new player and don't yet have a steady stream of income, then go ahead and put all your points into strength up to a base of 250 (the end of your 3:1 Strength cap.) After that, you'll want to put your points into either Wisdom or Vitality. The Strength Enutrof is different from the Chance Enutrof in that it is less reliant on Wisdom with respect to reducing movement points, more effectively reduces movement points at mid- to close-range, and is able to reduce an enemy's resistance to movement-point-reduction (and thus a stronger team player and more valued by Sadidas, Cras, and others who can reduce movement points.) Depending on your play style, you may also want to invest character points into your Vitality; however, be aware that an Enutrof – no matter your build – will never hit as hard as a Sram, Ecaflip, or Iop. This means that even if you have a strong close-combat game, you will ultimately depend on keeping your enemies at a distance. Because Wisdom governs your ability to reduce movement-points, you will ultimately want to put more points into Wisdom than Vitality.

If you're a veteran player and have a fat bank or the ability to gather Doploons for character point scrolls, then you will absolutely want to scroll your Wisdom and Strength. Many players say that when a character stat reaches the end of its 3:1 cap you should leave it and invest in another character stat such as Wisdom or Vitality; however, the Strength Enutrof benefits from the fact that his lethal-attack (Prime of Life) and Living Shovel both reduce the enemy's resistance to movement-point loss. This means that the Strength Enutrof (unlike the Chance Enutrof) is substantially less reliant on Wisdom for reducing movement-points, so if you have scrolled your Wisdom (and have a good Cawwot Dofus or +Wisdom mount or pet) you can push all your remaining points into either Strength or Vitality – it just depends on how you want to play your Enutrof. I encourage you to spend your time playing your class and not rushing as fast as possible to level 200 because this will teach you how to use your spells correctly and how to successfully play your Enutrof. I also encourage you to resist the urge to put all your character points into Wisdom thinking you'll beg you way to level 200 in a Prespic set because that's just embarrassing.

With respect to levelling your spells – and depending on your strategy – you can follow a few different paths. The first path is to level one spell at a time to level 5; this is a fair strategy if you're playing with high-leveled friends who are helping you gain character experience (also called leeching.) After all, if you're only going to spend a few weeks (or a few days) between level 1 and level 100, there's not much point in being choosy how to distribute your spell points; however, if you're like me and probably the majority of other players, you're going to spend a bit of time playing solo, grouping with people your own level, and making slower character progress because you're working on your professions at the same time.

I recommend that you first raise each spell to level 4. The reasoning behind this is that the Enutrof depends on a variety of spells to control the battlefield and survive in combat. You'll need six spell points per spell you raise to level 4, so this gives you a lot of flexibility to work with your set, mount, weapon, and trophy bonuses to determine which spells you need at level 5 first and which spells can wait. I recommend this strategy because the Enutrof depends on the synergy of several staple spells to succeed in battle and you'll only be handicapping yourself if you insist on following a “level X spell to 5, then level Y spell to 5, then level Z spell to 5” sort of path.

CLASS SPELLS

The Strength Enutrof will depend on the following spells; they are listed according to the level at which they are obtained and grouped by category:

SUMMONS

Living Bag: level 1
Living Bag is an essential spell without which no self-respecting Enutrof would venture into the world. The Living Bag is your all-purpose shield: it takes damage based on your resistances, so as a Strength Enutrof you can shop around for a resistance-maged sets at your level and reap the benefit. The Living Bag is also a spectacular tool for shielding hard-hitting allies and hit-taking tanks who need just another turn or two to wipe out a mob. The Living Bag doesn't require line-of-sight, so this means you can hide behind an ally or an obstacle and cast away without entering the line of fire.

Living Shovel: level 26
Since the 2.10 update, the Living Shovel has been moved from level 90 to level 26. This is a great boon for the Enutrof since the Living Shovel is a primary tool for controlling the battlefield. Like the Living Bag, the Living Shovel doesn't require a line of sight to cast, which means you can pick and choose where to put it.

A word of wisdom to the Enutrof: the Living Shovel is a great tool, but is also difficult to use easily. The best way to use it is to deploy it against an enemy already close to a wall (thus trapping it in a crevice); against an enemy trying to hide behind an obstacle (thus pushing it into the open for your allies to attack); or against an enemy to push it into either your team's or its own offensive glyphs. The worst way to use Living Shovel is to cast it in an open area in front of an enemy: if you deploy it in this manner, the enemy can just walk around the shovel and position itself between you and the shovel. Then on the next turn, the Living Shovel will push the enemy closer to you.

For better and for worse, the Living Shovel has poor artificial intelligence and doesn't distinguish between “pushing the enemy away from you” and “pushing the enemy toward you.” The only thing this summon will do is push and impose a move-point-loss malus, so this means you need to use Clumsiness against your own summon to limit its movement points; doing so will help you control its movement and better predict its positioning. I have used Living Shovel successfully in player-vs-player combat, but it requires careful planning and execution to make it work. Living Shovel is also a great tool for the single-accounter in player-vs-monster combat: I often use it to distract Frigost monsters for a few turns while I make an escape. If you don't want to level this spell, you can put the points into Weapon Skill or Mass Clumsiness.

Living Chest: level 100
The Living Chest is a magnificent thing. At the time of this writing, it still gives a second loot roll, and I absolutely adore it for the money it earns me; however, I also adore it for the added offensive options it provides. As a Strength Enutrof, I can hit in Earth with my spells and Neutral with my melee weapon, but the Living Chest attacks in the element of Water; this means for me that I can attack a larger variety of mobs with less fear of their resistances. The Living Chest also hits on all four adjoining cells, so it provides another area-effect attack. Since the 2.10 update, the Living Chest is also able to reveal hidden objects (invisible players and traps); this is moderately useful against Srams in player-vs-player combat, but is also very useful against a variety of monsters in player-vs-monster combat.

The Living Chest is a terrific meat shield and does a lovely job of blocking enemies' line of sight and triggering carefully laid traps, but it must be said that it deals no damage unless it's hurt. In fact, the fewer hit points it has, the more damage it deals. In player-vs-player combat, other players will know better than to attack your summon, so you'll have to hit it a few times to get it started, but once it's reached half- or quarter-health, you can summon a Living Bag. Remember – the Living Bag takes damage according to the target's resistances, and with the Living Chest's high resists, you'll get great value for the cost of your summon.
ATTACKS

Shovel Throwing: level 1
Don't underestimate this spell: it's a staple attack for the Strength Enutrof and its 1/40 critical-hit ratio will roll good more often than you expect. It's easy to criticize Shovel Throwing – it is, after all, a four action-point spell with no additional effects – but compared to the Enutrof's spells in other elements is actually quite nice. Compared to Shovel of Judgment, Shovel Throwing has longer range and higher base damage which means for you that you're able to deal more damage and keep greater distance than the Chance Enutrof. The difference between Shovel Throwing and Shovel of Judgment is in the lethal attacks of the same elements: Prime of Life (Earth) reduces resistance to move-point loss, whereas Slaughtering Shovel simply deals damage. In other words, the Strength Enutrof trades an effect on his mid-level attack for an effect on his lethal attack.

The other advantage the Strength Enutrof has over the Chance Enutrof is that he gets his attacks earlier (levels 1, 13, and 21), whereas the Chance Enutrof must wait until levels 60 and 70 for his medium- and lethal-attack spells. This means that the Strength Enutrof can reach level 6 on all of his attacks sooner than the Chance Enutrof and possesses stronger offensive capabilities earlier than the Chance Enutrof. I have Shovel Throwing at level 6 and I use it every fight – I don't know how I'd get by without it.

Mound: level 13
Oh, Mound, glorious Mound – you are a blessing from Lord Enutrof himself. Compare Mound to the area-effect spells of other classes:

  • The Osamodas' Punch of Crackler is a close-range attack with a non-extendable range of 1 which hits on a cross of three cells and until level 6 is restricted to one cast per turn.
  • The Iop's four action-point Sword of Iop is a linear attack with a non-extendable range of 1-5 which hits on a cross of four cells.
  • The Pandawa's two action-point Explosive Flask is a linear attack with a range of 2-5 which hits on a cross of three cells and is restricted to one cast per turn.
  • The Sadida's three action-point Manifold Bramble is a linear attack with a non-extendable range of 0-7 which hits on an area of five cells and is restricted to one cast per turn.
  • The Xelor's five action-point Temporal Dust is a non-linear attack with a range of 0-7 which hits on a cross of three cells.
  • The Cra's four action-point Explosive Arrow is a non-linear attack with an extendable range of 1-8 and hits on an area of three cells.
  • The Enutrof's three action point Mound is a non-linear attack with an extendable range of 2-8 which hits on a cross of seven cells
So in comparison, the Enutrof's three action-point, extended-range, 1/30 critical-hit, area-effect attack is looking pretty good. The fact that Mound is non-linear means that the Enutrof also has substantially greater flexibility and ability to maneuver than other classes which must put themselves both close to and (for maximum damage) directly facing their targets. The only other class with a non-linear, ranged, extendable, area-effect attack similar to the Enutrof's is the Cra, but unlike the Enutrof the Cra's attack is four action-points and hits on an area less than half as large as the Enutrof's.

The other terrific thing about Mound (and all area-effect spells, really) is that you can use it to hit behind and around obstacles, effectively giving you a spell which doesn't require line-of-sight. Finally, Mound has identical range to the Chance Enutrof's Coins Throwing because of its seven-cell cross area-effect and ability to hit targets on the other side of a barrier. Coins Throwing has a maximum range of 12 and Mound has a maximum range of 8; however, the edge of Mound's seven-cell cross extends out to provide a combined range of 12.

In other words, Coins Throwing and Mound have the same range, which means that the Strength Enutrof can play the range-game as well as the Chance Enutrof. For just three action-points, the Enutrof with 10 action-points can cast it twice per turn with room left over for Shovel Throwing, Prime of Life, or a few casts of other support spells. When combined with strong +Strength or +Power gear, the Strength Enutrof's Mound is an efficient, low-cost attack that can't be blocked by hiding behind obstacles, summons, or turrets.

Prime of Life: level 21
Before the 2.10 update, Enutrof's had two Agility spells: Prime of Life (an attack which stole movement points) and Unsummoning (an attack which only affected summons.) After the 2.10 update, the developers revised the Enutrof, changed the elements of Prime of Life and Unsummoning respectively to Earth and Fire, and changed their effect. Prime of Life, formerly a low-hitting Agility spell, became a heavy-hitting Strength spell with the added bonus that for two turns it significantly reduces the target's resistance to losing movement points. The Chance Enutrof's Slaughtering Shovel deals more damage and has greater range, but the Strength Enutrof's Prime of Life is fixed range (meaning it can't be reduced by the Cra's Bat Eye) and its added bonus of reducing resistance to move-point loss makes the Strength Enutrof less dependent on Wisdom than the Chance Enutrof who needs high movement-point reduction abilities to fully utilize Shovel of Judgment. On top of all this, Slaughtering Shovel costs five action-points to cast, unlike Prime of Life which requires only four action-points. In comparison, I think the Strength Enutrof is getting the better deal: high damage, comparatively low action-points to cast, two casts per turn, non-reducible range, and an added bonus? I know which spell is the better value.

However, having said all that, the Strength Enutrof cannot use his Prime of Life as freely as the Chance Enutrof may use his Slaughtering Shovel. Because Prime of Life has a shorter fixed range, the Strength Enutrof should not charge into the middle of combat just to cast it. I find in my experience in both PvP and PvM that Prime of Life is a threat to dangle in front of your enemies: “Are you sure you want to come that close? Because, you know... you can do that if you want, but I'm gonna smack you.” The Strength Enutrof must use Prime of Life like a fencer: he controls the distance between himself and his foe, dancing in and out of mid- to long-range, and using Prime of Life to give his foe a painful reminder that he should keep his distance. In practice, I use Prime of Life and Shovel Throwing as the same spell, the only difference being that I use Prime of Life when it's time to make an advancing enemy sit still and Shovel Throwing when they're a safe distance away.

The other advantage Prime of Life has over both Shovel of Judgment and Slaughtering Shovel is that it doesn't reduce movement-points, but reduces the target's resistance to losing movement-points. What this means for you is that Strength Enutrofs will be more valuable as part of a team: Sadidas, Cras, and others who can reduce movement-points will utilize this malus as a group to utterly and completely remove an enemy's ability to move. In a group, this is extra useful for player-vs-player combat, but also in player-vs-monster combat: dungeon bosses like the Bworker come to mind, as do others with instant-kills whom you want to keep away from your team and glued to one spot.

BUFFS AND HEALS

Acceleration: level 6
Like Living Bag, no self-respecting Enutrof would be seen without this spell. Acceleration is a staple spell and also essential to the Enutrof's ability to keep away. At level 6 Acceleration has a very short cool-down to recast, but that doesn't mean you can use it carelessly. Pretend, if you will, that a werewolf is going to break through your front door at any moment and Acceleration is your one and only silver bullet. No, seriously – Acceleration is that valuable. If you're five to six cells away from your target, that's probably too far away to bother using Acceleration; instead, you'll likely want to save it for when your enemy locks you and you've got to use Fortune to boost your dodge and position yourself for your next attack.

But don't be fooled: Acceleration is not just about escaping but also about advancing. The Enutrof depends on his ability to keep away, but from time to time you'll find that your enemy is in a vulnerable state between buffs and heals and is hoping for the sake of his honor points that you can't close the distance; in this case, you can use Acceleration to mount a fast cavalry charge with the help of Greed, Fortune, or Weapon Skill and smack your enemy for some massive damage.

Greed: level 31
Before the 2.10 update, Greed buffed only Strength and Intelligence and was principally used by drop-mule Chance Enutrofs to compliment an Iop's attacks and an Eniripsa's heals. Greed also had a five-turn duration which meant that it was very dangerous for the Enutrof to deploy and in the case of Intelligence Enutrofs they were required to spam Ghostly Shovel to de-buff their enemies before they got too close.

After the 2.10 update, Greed's duration and cool-down to recast are both shorter and instead of buffing just Strength and Intelligence it now buffs Power. For the Enutrof this means that Greed can now be used to increase the power of Water spells, but for teams with an Enutrof this means that everybody benefits regardless of their primary offensive element. Many Enutrofs cried foul at the new Greed's shorter duration, but in practice this means that it's easier to use without fear of a seriously buffed mob of enemies running up on you. The Enutrof no longer needs to spam Ghostly Shovel to de-buff the enemy and the shorter duration means that it's easier to use Clumsiness to slow down an enemy and simply keep out of range until the end of Greed's buff. Greed is fantastic and is an invaluable tool for solo and group play.

Fortune: level 54
Before the 2.10 update, Fortune was only used by Chance Enutrofs to buff their Water attacks. The spell also gave a few extra points of prospection, but in my opinion the bonus was marginal. In response to complaints from the player body and feedback provided by the Zentih, Fortune was changed in the 2.10 update to provide two turns of effects: a massive dodge bonus on the first turn, and a massive power bonus on second turn. Also in the 2.10 update, the elementary spell Release was changed to cost three action-points at all levels. Release has previously been a staple spell for the Enutrof – and some people say it still is – but with the massive dodge bonus provided by Fortune, Release has become less important.

In practice this means that you can still use Release when you need it, but you don't have to invest any spell points into its progression to lower its cost in action-points. Before the new Fortune, I used Release in every fight. After the new Fortune, I rarely use Release. Some players with limited vision complain that level 6 Fortune only gives 40 dodge, or the equivalent of +400 Agility, and that they're still getting locked by Agility Srams' doubles and other high-agility characters. Well, too bad – you can't have everything. Having massively high agility in order to lock an opponent is part of the ultimate play strategy of some classes who have few options except to get close and stay on top of their opponent. If you can't accept that, then you need to play another class.

Some players with limited vision also complain that Fortune isn't useful because it doesn't give the power bonus on the first turn, but all of the Enutrof's spells must be weighed against the class's primary strategy: keep away. Imagine, if you will, that you are fighting an Enutrof: you just closed the distance and locked the Enutrof, only to see him buff his dodge and escape to a better position. On top of that, the Enutrof will have a +300% power bonus on its next turn. What do you think you're going to do? Are you going to close the distance again and expose yourself to some really massive damage, or are you going to try and escape to safer ground? I think you'd want to back off and keep yourself away, and that fits into the Enutrof's ultimate defensive strategy. Some players with limited vision also don't appreciate that in combat against multiple opponents it's not always a matter of being locked by Enemy A and wanting to smack Enemy A, but about being locked or by Enemy A and wanting to smack Enemy B. And of course don't forget that you can always use Fortune on an ally: Iops, Ecaflips, Srams, Masqueraiders, and others with seriously over-the-top offensive spells will appreciate your ability to push their attacks into another universe.

Pandora's Box: level 9
Before the 2.10 update, Pandora's Box was a garbage spell. It either gave mediocre critical hits, or else it gave a very poor heal, but it never did both at the same time and you never knew which one it would do. Pandora's randomness and poor effects made it totally undesirable except to a few Intelligence Enutrofs. After the 2.10 update, Pandora's Box was changed to provide percentage-based heals. This change gave Enutrofs of any variety the ability to provide moderate heals regardless of their build. Part of what's great about this percentage-based heal is that it's not dependent on Intelligence: the Enutrof has very poor Intelligence caps, so having a percentage based heal helps it overcome this obstacle.

Pandora's Box doesn't seem like much, but it can make a big difference over the duration of a long fight. Pandora's heals are indexed to the maximum vitality of the target, so characters of any class who have invested scrolls or character points into vitality will notice a larger benefit. A word to the wise, though: don't waste your time casting this spell on your summons. Think about it: if Pandora's Box only heals 8% of the target's maximum vitality, and your target only has 600 hit-points, that means you're only healing 48 hit-points; however, if you cast it on a 4,000 hit-point Sacrier, you're healing 320 hit points. See the difference?

The only drawback to Pandora's Box is that the turn after the heal it imposes a movement-point reduction malus on the caster which makes it difficult to keep enemies away. This sounds really terrible, but in practice I've found that it's not a large concern. As a Strength Enutrof, I can smack my enemy with Prime of Life and significantly reduce their resistance to movement-point loss for two turns and if the timing is also right put my Living Shovel on them. If you're new to the World of Twelve and haven't established a strong flow of kamas, then you'll probably want to ignore Pandora's Box in favor of Weapon Skill or almost any other spell in your arsenal. Pandora's Box is better and better as your hit-points become higher and higher, so it makes sense that you're going to wait until after level 100 to start progressing this spell. If you don't want to level this spell, you can put the points into Weapon Skill or Mass Clumsiness.

Bribery: level 80
The Enutrof has several class spells useful for stopping an enemy: Clumsiness will slow an enemy to a crawl, Pull-Out will stop an enemy in its tracks, but Bribery will force the enemy to skip a turn. The downside to this is that Bribery heals 20% of your enemy's hit-points and also forbids you from using a close-combat weapon for two turns, but this malus is less severe since the 2.11 update and casting restrictions on close-combat weapons. In practice, I've found that I rarely want or need to use Bribery in player-vs-monster combat, the exceptions being against very powerful dungeon bosses. Instead, I've found that Bribery's greatest power is in player-vs-player combat and is especially useful against summons and turrets. Like Pandora's Box, Bribery's heals are indexed to the target's maximum vitality, so if you're fighting against a Foggernaut who just got his 1,000 hit-point harpooner to level three, you can feel pretty good about bribing it: after all, it's only going to heal 200 hit-points, and that's just a drop in the bucket.

Used against allies, Bribery heals 40% of the targets maximum hit-points, so this means against an ally with 2,500 hit-points you'll heal 1,000 hit-points and that's nothing to sneeze at. Of course, Bribery still makes the target skip a turn regardless of its status as friend or foe, so you'll want to pair Bribery with Ghostly Shovel to remove the malus. On a team without an Eniripsa, an Enutrof can make do with his heals and shields. It's certainly no replacement for strong, reliable, frequent heals provided by the Eniripsa, but it's still a great tactical advantage. Be aware that Bribery has a global cool-down of four turns, meaning that if another Enutrof on the team casts Bribery you'll have to wait a bit.

SPEED BUMPS

Pull-Out: purchase for Doploons at your class temple
Pull-out is a great spell, but having said that, I wouldn't invest any spell points into its progression. The primary reason I won't invest any spell points into Pull-Out is that it doesn't become any more powerful as it progresses. The secondary reason I won't invest any spell points into Pull-Out is that I rarely have either the need or the opportunity to cast it more than once per fight. The Enutrof is a deceptively difficult class to play because it requires the player to pay very close attention to conservation of action points, spells' cool-down time to recast, appropriate timing, and controlling the distance between oneself and one's enemies.

In solo-play, the Strength Enutrof will want to pair Pull-Out with Clumsiness, Greed, Fortune, and Mound to line up enemy mobs for several turns of massive hits. In a team, the Enutrof will use Pull-Out the same way: to position enemy mobs for area-effect attacks and line up targets for allies' finishing moves, but also to purchase time for an Eniripsa, Osamodas, Sadida, or Foggernaut to heal and buff the team or prepare for a greater assault. Pull-Out is also a powerful tool when paired with a Feca's glyphs, but like anything, it depends on appropriate timing, positioning, and opportunity.

Reducing Key: level 17
Reducing Key is one of the Enutrof's staple spells without which he will not survive. The great thing about Reducing Key is that you receive it at level 17, but surprisingly you won't need it very much until you start fighting level 70+ monsters, temple dopples, dungeon bosses, and other players. Before the 2.10 update, Reducing Key had a longer duration and longer cool-down to recast, but after the 2.10 update it was given a shorter duration and shorter cool-down to recast. Some players with limited vision cried foul at this change, but in practice it means that you can cast Reducing Key on more targets more often. You can wait to level Reducing Key until after level 50, but I remember that I didn't need it until almost level 100.

Clumsiness: level 42
Clumsiness is another staple spell for Enutrofs and it's something that you'll probably use in every fight. The upside is that Clumsiness costs only one action-point to cast and at level 6 can reduce three movement-points which, for the casting cost, is spectacular economy of action-points; the downside, however, is that Clumsiness is dependent on Wisdom and you probably won't have enough Wisdom to consistently reduce enemies' movement-points until almost level 100. So yes, absolutely, you need to invest spell-points into Clumsiness, but you have to weigh the progression of this spell against the progression of your character stats. Most Enutrof players will probably want to wait until after level 60 to begin progressing Clumsiness because they'll notice a larger benefit in their game-play by progressing other spells first.

Mass Clumsiness: level 48
In my experience, Mass Clumsiness costs too much to cast, is too difficult to use, and is too weak compared to action-point reduction spells found in other classes. The best situation in which an Enutrof would use Mass Clumsiness is when he's totally surrounded by a large mob of enemies. Mass Clumsiness is, like Clumsiness, dependent on Wisdom, so even though you get the spell at level 48, you probably won't have enough Wisdom to make it useful until after level 100. The shame of it is that Mass Clumsiness was reworked in the 2.9 update to have a shorter cool-down and cost fewer action-points to cast, yet it's still unwieldy and so situation-dependent that most Enutrof players prefer to invest their spell-points into something else; however, like all things, it depends on how you've built and play your Enutrof, so if Mass Clumsiness fits into your strategy then by all means you should use it.

ELEMENTARY SPELLS

Release: global drop; gather it yourself or purchase it on the market
Release is an elementary spell which when used causes your character to push back enemies on all sides for two to four cells depending on how high it's been levelled. Before the 2.10 update, Release had a comparatively high cost in action-points to cast at level 1 and progressively cost fewer action-points as it approached level 6; however, since the 2.10 update, its cost in action-points has been normalized across all levels to just three action-points. In practice, this means for Enutrofs that they can still use Release but that they won't need to steal any spell-points from Fortune in order to gain as large a benefit. Release still receives a shorter cool-down to recast as it progresses, but Enutrofs can survive with Fortune well enough that they aren't obligated to level this spell beyond level 1.

Weapon Skill: reward for completing Smith Dungeon
Before the 2.11 update, there was a weapon skill spell for each type of weapon in the game which meant you'd have to play Pokemon and “catch 'em all” (or buy 'em all) as you changed your melee weapon. This also meant that you had to unlearn your old weapon skill so you could learn the new weapon skill. After the 2.11 update, all weapon skills were replaced by a single weapon skill which directly buffs your weapon's power. It was also changed so that you had to possess minimum level requirements before you could raise it to certain levels.

In my experience, I did not possess a melee weapon worth using until after character level 120; before that, my spells did more damage and cost fewer action-points to use; however, the developers of Dofus have revised the close-combat system and made weapons more accessible to more players at earlier levels. For the Strength Enutrof, this means you can be very strong in close-combat when you pair Weapon Skill with Fortune or Greed (or both at once) for potentially a base +760% power buff (before counting your base Strength and set and mount bonuses.) I recommend levelling Weapon Skill before Clumsiness and Reducing Key because I think the close-combat bonus out-weighs a Wisdom-dependent spell and a spell you won't use until fighting either high-level monsters and other players.

MELEE WEAPONS

Before the 2.11 update, all classes in Dofus were restricted to the weapons they could choose. Their primary weapon dealt 100% damage, their secondary weapon dealt 95% damage, and all other tertiary weapons dealt 90% damage. In the case of Sacriers, all weapons dealt only 90% damage. For Enutrofs, their primary weapon was the shovel, and their secondary weapon was the hammer. After the 2.11 update, the developers revised the Weapon Skill spell and changed the weapon system so that any class could use any weapon and deal 100% damage without being restricted to primary, secondary, or tertiary preference. After the 2.11 update, the developers also changed shovels to deal damage as a two-cell linear area-effect extending out from the principal target. Axes were also changed so that they could hit not just targets on each side of the wielder, but also to the diagonal of the wielder.

These changes mean that all classes have equal opportunity with respect to their favored weapon and this also gives each class greater ability to overcome class limitations (ranged bows for classes with short-range spells, and powerful swords or hammers for classes with spells restricted by minimum-ranges.) For the Strength Enutrof, this means he can select weapons typically preferred by Iops, Masqueraiders, Pandawas, and Ecaflips, and with the help of Fortune, Greed, and Weapon Skill dish out some hearty damage. Axes are particularly attractive for Enutrofs because their diagonal targets allow the Enu to attack at close range without approaching toe-to-toe and getting locked. There are a lot of changes coming to the weapons available in Dofus after the 2.11 update and after it arrives this list may be inaccurate; if you see an inaccuracy, please reply to this thread or send me an Ankabox so I can fix it. Remember as in all things to balance your melee weapon against your set, mount, gear, spells, and preferred style of game-play. Also, you aren't limited to these weapons: your menu will expand substantially if you increase your Intelligence.

Early-game weapons: levels 1-75
  • Hevlalav hatchet
  • Terophyle Axe
  • Yew Axe
  • Walnut Cutter
  • Oak Killer
  • Stone Axe
  • Crack Axe
  • Nidanwa Axe
  • Purrin Axe
  • Treechnid Splitter
  • Powerful Twiggy Bow
  • Small Gobball Horn Bow
  • Treebow
  • Trunknydum
  • Koalak Bow
  • Penn Knives
  • Unlucky Knight's Broken Sword
  • Gobball Hammer
  • Tetra Hammer
  • Draugur Chafer Hammer
  • Refactor Hammer
  • Gobherd staff
  • Wa Wabbit's staff
  • Ambusher-Up
  • Treestaff
  • Shodonwa staff
  • Kanniball Andchain's Sceptre
  • Powerful Twiggy Sword
  • Smithy Sword
  • Small Ha Sword
  • Small Holy Sword
  • Great Smithy Sword
  • Holy Sword
  • Ha Sword
  • Powerful Smithy Sword
  • Karne Rider Blade
  • Great Ha Sword
  • Great Holy Sword
  • Powerful Holy Sword
  • Powerful Ha Sword
  • Slash
  • Little Bwork Blade
  • The Sad Blade
  • Fwell Sword
  • Knight Sword
  • Great Knight Sword
  • The Klebik
  • Powerful Knight Sword
  • Badoul's Mane
  • Crackler Blade
  • Shodanwa Sabre
  • Viopal Sword
  • Earth Kwakblade
  • Ogralimde's Sword
  • Efferves Sword
  • Craft Knife
  • Kwakwa Blade
  • Great Craft Knife
  • Pretty Blade
  • Yench Cutting Sword
  • Kralove Cutting Sword
  • Bloody Craft Knife
  • Slicing Fan
Mid-game weapons: levels 75-150
  • Terrdala Axe
  • Sandanwa Axe
  • Pole Axe
  • Dame Zel Axe
  • Lookabeer Axe
  • Bards' Hall
  • Minotoror Axe
  • The Warf Axe
  • Cheeken Axe
  • Dreggon Bow
  • Falistos's Maul
  • Fantal Hammer
  • Farle's Staff
  • Aga Dou's Staff
  • Disast Root
  • Lady Root
  • Dark Treestaff
  • Daggero's Staff
  • Yondanwa Staff
  • Granny Candy's Stick
  • Black Mel Root (for heals)
  • Root 'Een
  • The Hagogue Root
  • Earlik Branch
  • Barkritter Root (for Strength/Chance Enutrofs)
  • Slicing Fan
  • Sandanwa Sabre
  • Tyse Pick
  • Perfect Ecaflip Paw
  • Pink Claw
  • Stalk Sword
  • Crimson Claw
  • Killarity Sword
Late- to End-game weapons: levels 150-200
  • Sick Axe
  • Archetypal Bow (for heals)
  • Vigi Pirate Hammer
  • Ougaammer
  • Professor Xa's Shovel
  • Minotot Sceptre
  • Splinter Sprinter
  • Aermyne's Rolling Pin
  • Peccary Blade
  • Giger's Nightmare Blade
SETS


Early-game sets: levels 1 to 75

These sets are listed in order of the character level at which you may equip them. The idea here is not that you should progress from one set to another in this order, but that you can see what options are available to you and make the best choice based on your character level, available kamas, and game-play style. Also, this list does not include individual, non-set items available on the market: you should evaluate those pieces on your own time and decide which will work for you. Remember to include a Gelano at level 60 and a Powerful Dazzling Belt at level 80 for two extra action-points.

  • Boon Set : If you're new to Dofus, you absolutely should complete all the Incarnum quests and get your Boom set. It's not much, but it's a heck of a lot better than either running around naked or embarrassing yourself in a Piwi set.
  • Young Adventurer Set : Depending on your finances and whether you have any friends to help you along, your next step is going to be the Adventurer set. Adventurer set pieces can often be dropped from enemies, but you can also typically find the set pieces for sale on the market. The Adventurer Hat and Cape can be relatively expensive, but the full set will serve you well.
  • Gobball Set : The Gobball set is useful for Strength Enutrofs and also hybrid Strength/Intelligence Enutrofs. The set gives an additional action-point and if you get one with good Strength rolls you can probably stay in it until level 50 or higher.
  • Earth Kwak Set : This is a staple set for Strength characters and if properly maged also very good for player-vs-player combat. It's not difficult to craft, but the demand for the Kwak sets is relatively high so you'll probably find it less expensive to get your friends or your guild to help you gather the set pieces and craft the items for you.
  • Ancient Chafer Set : This set introduced in the 2.9 update provides a solid Strength bonus, buffs neutral damage, and gives an additional movement-point. Draugur Chafer Hammer is great with Weapon Skill spell in this set.
  • Treechnid Set : This set will reduce your move-points by one, but will increase your action-points by two and also buff your Strength. You may have a difficult time surviving if you can't keep away from your enemies, but this means you'll have more action-points to spend each turn for Shovel Throwing x 2, Prime of Life x 2, Mound x 2 plus other buffs, or Mound and Shovel Throwing or Prime of Life plus Acceleration. If you have any Wisdom yet, the Treechnid Staff will be fun for reducing action-points.
  • Green Scaraleaf Set : You won't get any action-point or movement-point bonuses from this set, but it gives really terrific Strength bonuses. You can get a terrific Strength bonus if you equip this full set and finish it out with pieces from the Earth Kwak set, but if you have a full Earth Kwak set you'll probably want to stay in it.
  • Crackler Set : This set doesn't give much in the way of +Strength, but it will give you some great resistances. Depending on your play style, you may enjoy shielding yourself with Living Bag and tanking your way through a mob using Prime of Life and Weapon Skill.
  • Pippin Blop Set : Another solid +Strength set. You'll get an additional action-point, some extra range, and few more summons out of it, but you'll also get a -50% weakness to Air damage. Pick your poison.
  • Boowolf Set: Except for an extra action-point, this set will give you everything you need: +Strength, +Wisdom, and +Vitality. +Range, +Summon, and an extra movement-point. You can make up the extra action-point by equipping a Gelano and you'll be ready to go for both player-vs-monster and player-vs-player combat.
  • Royal Gobball Set : The pure-strength Enutrof may find the Boowolf set more attractive than the Royal Gobball set, but if you decide to go hybrid and incorporate Intelligence spells into your repertoire (Shovel Kiss, Ghostly Shovel, Unsummoning) then this set will be right up your alley.

Mid-game sets: levels 75-150

As before, these sets are listed in order of the character level at which you may equip them. The idea here is not that you should progress from one set to another in this order, but that you can see what options are available to you and make the best choice based on your character level, available kamas, and game-play style. Also, this list does not include individual, non-set items available on the market: you should evaluate those pieces on your own time and decide which will work for you.

  • Farle Ingalsse Set : If you can find a Strength-maged version of this set, you're in business: the set will buff your summons, range, action-points, movement-points, and power, making this an attractive set for almost any Strength character.
  • Royal Pippin Blop Set : the Royal Pippin set isn't spectacular, but it's only four pieces which means you can equip it with another set for potentially greater bonuses. It'll buff your action-points, movement-points, range, and summons, but it doesn't help your Strength as much as some of the other sets available to you at this level.
  • Terrdala Set : The Terrdala set is another great +Strength set and is terrific for player-vs-player combat, but to equip the entire set you must have at least rank 3. This set is everything you need: summons, range, action-points, movement-points, Strength, Vitality, and Wisdom. If you can get rank 3, this set will serve you very well.
  • Bwork Chief Set : Like the Farle Inglasse set, you'll want to find a Strength-maged version because it will last you a long time. Action-point, movement-points, range, and strong resists all make it a real treat.
  • Gorgoyle Set : Unless you're a hybrid Strength/Intelligence build, this set may not be for you unless you can find a Strength-maged version. If you can, everything you want is here.
  • Ancestral Set : The Ancestral set is great for hybrid Chance/Strength Enutrofs, but as a pure Strength Enutrof, there are better options. Having said that, the power, damage, range, action-point, and movement-point buffs are terrific.
  • Dreggon Set : This is a good set for the Chance/Intelligence/Strength Enutrof, or for any dual-element hybrid build in between. You'll get massive damage and power buffs, as well as strong resists, action-point, movement-points, range, and several summons. For the pure Strength Enutrof, there are better options available.
  • Moowolf Set: Like the Soft Oak set, if you can find one that's been nicely maged you could probably use it all the way until end-game levels. Moowolf set is great for any Strength character and has everything you want in a set: action and movement points, resistances, and great buffs for power, damage, strength, wisdom, and vitality.
  • Soft Oak Set: Like the Ancestral set, the Soft Oak set is for hybrid Enutrofs, this time for Intelligence/Strength builds. If you go that route, then a well-maged Soft Oak set can serve you all the way up to end-game. If you're not hybrid, then a strength-maged set could work well for you because it has all the terrific buffs you want in a set.
  • Royal Pingwin Set : The Royal Pingwin set is great for hybrid Chance/Strength Enutrofs, but the pure Strength Enutrof may not like it; however, having said that, it's only three pieces, so if you need to fill out another set then it might work wellf or you. Not much base Strength or Chance, but the power, damage, and resistances are well worth while.
  • Venerable Set (Cape Hernaum and Rememb Ring ): As a Strength Enutrof, you will not want to equip your full class set – even with all the fun spell bonuses, it will be a weak set and you'll find game-play to be difficult; however, if you have a few gaps in your set, you may want to fill them out with the Venerable set's cape and ring which will respectively buff your Mound, Living Bag, and Acceleration, as well as your Shovel Throwing, Greed, Reducing Key, and Clumsiness.

Late- to End-game sets: levels 150-200

As before, these sets are listed in order of the character level at which you may equip them. The idea here is not that you should progress from one set to another in this order, but that you can see what options are available to you and make the best choice based on your character level, available kamas, and game-play style. Also, this list does not include individual, non-set items available on the market: you should evaluate those pieces on your own time and decide which will work for you.

  • Obsidemon Set: Regardless of whether you're a hybrid Intelligence/Strength or pure Strength Enutrof, the Obsidemon set will be good for you. It gives everything you want in a set – action-point, movement-point, range, and summons, but it also gives Strength, Wisdom, Vitality, earth damage, neutral damage, and a +power buff. The set also provides a +dodge bonus (especially good for Enutrofs) as well as a variety of resistances.
  • Funguset: This set won't give you an action-point bonus, but then, it's only three pieces and it still gives Strength, Wisdom, Vitality, and some terrific resistances.
  • Berserker Bworker Set: If you can't find a Strength-maged version of this set, then you're probably better off looking for something else.
  • Borealis Set: Strong buffs, great resistances, lovely damage, good dodge, and the summons and range are lovely, but it doesn't give an action-point so you may be better off waiting for something else or just using its pieces to fill out a custom set.
  • Fuji Snowfoux Set: You'll get a massive Vitality and +power buff out of this set – and the MP reduction bonus is quite nice - but unless you can find a version of this maged for Strength, then you might want something else.
  • Professor Xa Set: This is an outstanding set for dual- or tri-element Enutrofs. Truly, if you're dual- or tri-element, this set doesn't leave much else to be desired. Well worth crafting or purchasing if it fits into your strategy.
  • Hail Set: Good for pure Strength and hybrid Chance/Strength Entrofs; the set provides a massive power and damage buff, good resists, plus summons, action-point, and movement-point.
  • Brouce Boulgoure Set: As far as pure-Strength sets go, the Broucey set is quite nearly everything you need. Strength, Vitality, and Wisdom, plus neutral and earth damage buffs, strong resists, dodge, range, movement-point, and action-point. Pairs nicely with other sets but also goes very well with a variety of individual non-set pieces.

Frigost 3 Sets
Needless to say, if you've reached this character level you've probably got a good idea where you want to go with your gear; however, for the sake of completeness, I've included the Frigost 3 sets. Remember that all these sets are only a few items which means that you're going to have to mix and match them with other pieces. Also, like the other categories of gear, this list does not included individual non-set pieces of equipment - you'll need to review those on your own time.
  • Count Harebourg Set - Strong +Strength bonuses, but this set significantly reduces your neutral damage and thus your ability to fight with a neutral-damage melee weapon. It also lowers resists most of your resistsances and your initiative.
  • Treadfast Set - This is a great set for Strength/Intelligence hybrid Enus. Pair it with another set to take best advantage of its +power bonuses.
  • Nocturnowl Set - reduces critical hits and critical hit damage, but still a strong set for enus who like to play close.
  • Vicieuse Set - I'm not sure what the English spelling is since I can only find this set listed in French, but it's attractive for Enus because of its strong MP reduction bonuses. The +agility and dodge bonuses are also useful for helping the Enu escape.
  • Missiz Freezz Set - This is a fantastic set for any strength based character, but having said that, Enus should be cautious because it lowers initiative and dodge which will make it easier for your enemies to lock you.
  • Sylargh Set - Lovely bit of gear, this: powerful +strength set with strong +damage bonuses. The only draw-back is that it has no AP bonus, so pair it with another set to get the best result.

TROPHIES AND DOFUS

Dozens of trophies, trophies for you! Yes, it's true, everything you could every possibly want is now available to you through the powerful, sparkly, shiny, and expensive trophies crafted by Shieldsmiths. Like I've said a bunch of times in this guide, there's rule saying that you absolutely must play your Enutrof a certain way. Heck, if you want to build an Agility Enutrof and craft it so you can run around with daggers and charge head first into close-combat, that's your prerogative. And fortunately for you, there are enough trophies out there I suppose if your heart was really set on it you could make something that worked. But... having said that... as a Strength Enutrof you'll probably want some combination of the following trophies. Remember that minor trophies are equipped after level 50, medium trophies are equipped after level 100, and major trophies are equipped after level 150.

  • Survivor (vitality)
  • Maniac (strength)
  • Friction (movement-point reduction)
  • Escapist (dodge)
  • Twitcher (range)
  • Goliath (strength at the cost of vitality)
  • Shackler (movement-point reduction at the cost of vulnerability to action-point removal)
  • Voyager
  • Jackanapes

Survivor, Maniac, and Friction are just about the only trophies a Strength Enutrof will want. Escapist is quite useful, but with the bonus I receive from Fortune it's a low priority for me. I've experimented with the Earth Destroyer trophies, but linear-damage is less helpful for Strength spells than the percentage-based buff provided by the Maniac trophies. Friction, too, is a staple trophy for an Enutrof. Having a good Friction trophy will make you less dependent on Wisdom and will give you more consistent movement-point reduction through Clumsiness. Twitcher is probably a low priority for you since you already have good range in Shovel Throwing and Mound (and Prime of Life has fixed range), but if you have space and think you really need then go for it. Shackler is terrific for an Enutrof, but of course be aware that it makes you spectacularly vulnerable to action-point reduction. Stay away from Xelors. The trophies have become quite diverse since the 2.10 update, so the only limitations are your imagination and your budget.

I'd caution you to be very careful with the Goliath trophy: if you've invested plenty of points into Vitality, then it can work for you, but often enough a battle could have gone the other way if not for the absence of a few hundred hit-points. Be cautious. The Voyager and Jackanapes trophies are useful for an additional movement-point and action-point, respectively, but I wouldn't accept the negative dodge, lock and movement-point they impose; however, if your set, weapon, and mount are enough to avoid this obstacle, then you can use them.

Regarding Dofus, the most important one you can get reasonably cheap or even on your own at a high enough level is a +Wisdom Cawwot Dofus. A Kaliptus Dofus is fun for the prospection bonus, but of course it won't help you at all in combat. If you hurry up and complete your Eternal Harvest quest then you can get yourself an action-point Ochre Dofus, but that can take a while... well, it can also take dozens of millions of kamas, but I think that's out of the question for most people. Turquoise and Crimson Dofus are terrific if you can get them, but obtaining them is either a matter of luck or money.

MOUNTS

As usual, I'm not giving any straight and easy answers. When it comes to selecting your mount, remember as always to balance your mount against your melee weapon, set, trophies, dofus, and preferred style of play. If you depend on your summons and use them frequently, then choose an Almond breed. If you're more concerned about dishing about damage, then pick a Crimson breed. If you want to ensure that you can stay as far away as possible, then pick a Plum breed. If you want to maximize your movement-point reduction abilities, then pick a Golden breed. If you need extra vitality, then pick a Ginger breed. If you think the only thing you need to finish out your character is some extra movement-points, then pick an Emerald breed. There are so many mounts and so many ways to combine them with your character's gear and spell set that it really depends on what you make of it. Having said that, though, my personal preference is the Plum and Crimson... but don't let me influence your choice! The following list shows the mounts you'll probably want to choose for your Strength Enutrof and the bonuses they'll provide at level 100, so consider your options and choose wisely.

  • Almond: 2 summons
  • Almond and Crimson: 500 initiative, 50 vitality, 1 summon, 60 strength
  • Almond and Emerald: 500 initiative, 100 vitality, 1 summon, 1 movement-point
  • Almond and Golden: 500 initiative, 50 vitality, 25 wisdom, 1 summon
  • Crimson: 50 vitality, 80 strength
  • Crimson and Ginger: 150 vitality, 60 strength
  • Emerald and Crimson: 100 vitality, 1 movement-point, 30 strength
  • Golden and Crimson: 100 vitality, 25 wisdom, 60 strength
  • Plum and Crimson: 200 vitality, 1 range, 60 strength
  • Emerald: 200 vitality, 1 movement-point
  • Golden and Emerald: 100 vitality, 25 wisdom, 1 movement-point
  • Plum and Emerald: 200 vitality, 1 range, 1 movement-point
  • Ginger: 100 vitality
  • Almond and Ginger: 500 initiative, 100 vitality, 2 summons
  • Crimson and Ginger: 150 vitality, 60 strength
  • Emerald and Ginger: 300 vitality, 1 movement-point
  • Golden and Ginger: 100 vitality, 1 movement-point
  • Plum and Ginger: 300 vitality, 1 range
  • Plum and Golden: 200 vitality, 1 range, 25 wisdom


LEVEL-UP GUIDE

First thing I'm going to say is that brand-new, fresh-to-Incarnum players should stay in Incarnum and learn how to play the game: if you do all the missions and spend some time grouping with other players and learning how to play your class, you'll find it's quite easy to get to level 30. The Incarnum missions aren't hard to find - just run around and you'll probably discover them all on your own, or if you're the Wiki sort of person just click here. You'll also get a Boon set for your trouble which is good for a base +25 to all of your character stats. That'll be enough to get you started and when you finally go down to Astrub you'll be ready to open your world map and pick a new adventure.

Since the 2.11 update, a really cool new feature was added to the world map: the average level of monsters in that region. If you open your map and hover your cursor over a region, you'll see the coordinates of the cell you're targeting but you'll also see the entire region highlighted in its respective color (blue or red if Bonta or Brakmar owns it, or white if it's neutral) and an additional bit of text displaying the average level of monsters found in that region. This is significant because it's an in-game guide on where to take your character for levelling and gaining experience; however, having said that, the numbers can be a bit misleading.

What's important to remember is that the number you see is the level of monsters in that region, which is not the same as the average combined level of mobs in that region. For example, you might be level 15 and think by the guide that you can go to Gobball Corner and destroy everything in your sight, but when you get there you're going to find that you'll be up against mobs of anywhere between one and eight monsters for a combined average mob level of between 15 and 120. Obviously, level 30 mobs and higher are going to be a bit of a challenge for level 15 characters, so remember to make friends and travel in groups. When your character level (or the combined character level of all the players in your group) is closer to the combined level of all the monsters in a mob, you gain higher experience.

What this means for the solo-accounter who will spend a lot of time hunting by him or herself is that he or she should either go to regions close to his or her own character level and look for mobs of just one or two enemies, or else he or she should look for regions with monsters of an average level of about half his or her own character level and hunt those instead. For example, if you're a level 60 character, you can probably make better experience-per-minute hunting in the Lousy Pig plains which has an average monster level of 35, meaning that the average mob level will be between 35 and 280. If you stick to mobs with between one and three monsters, you'd probably be gaining experience faster than you would against single Kanigers on the Cania Plains.

Apart from that, remember that when looking for fast mobs that you'll want to focus on monsters who are weak to Earth damage or else who have no resistances to Earth damage. Anything in Incarnum, Piwis in Astrub, Field monsters above Astrub, Gobballs in Gobball Corner, Lousy Pigs on the Lousy Pig Plain, and monsters on the Sidimote Moore are all great choices because they have little or no resistances to earth damage. Depending on your play-style, Sidimote Moore can be a great place to level your character up to 100 and even beyond: with an average monster level of 40, this means the monsters will be fairly easy work and still give respectable experience for quite some time - just be sure to carry hit-point food or chain an Eniripsa to your ankle because with the Scurvions' and Ouginaks' mass-damage spells they'll really whittle away at your health points every fight.

And that's all she wrote! This guide ought to make the game much easier and more enjoyable for you than what I came up with as an Enutrof a couple years ago. Remember that even if you play as a solo- or multi-logger, you'll have more fun and make better progress if you group up with other players. Who knows - the lowby you meet on the recruiting channel today might be the end-game vet who helps you tomorrow. So bash some heads and have some fun!
hi mama i just wana know are enutrfos (str) are good for doples low lvls? (10-70) ? smile can they deafeat all dople s ? biggrin 
0 0
Reply
Score : 320

I'm really loving Mound, it might just be the best AoE spell in the game.

0 0
Reply
Score : 5621

Mound is awesome and it's really great for farming Tofus, Gobballs, and Wabbits.

0 0
Reply
Score : 417

why are you int/cha and not str

0 0
Reply
Score : 5621

At the moment I'm not chance at all - I'm full Intelligence.

I played Strength Enutrof, had a lot of fun, and wanted to play the last pure element that I hadn't yet experienced. Just because I don't play strength anymore doesn't mean it's a poor build - I'm just getting the full Enutrof experience, lol

0 -1
Reply
Score : 2

Str Enu is Great! Mound is amazing spell, rly nice on farming. Good guide!

0 0
Reply
Score : 72

Thanks!

0 0
Reply
Respond to this thread